Radon Testing Results Indicate Serious Public Safety Issue in Kentucky

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Information obtained from leading radon testing company indicates more than 50% of homes in 13 Kentucky counties contain radon levels in excess of the US Enviornmental Protection Agency action level of 4.0 pico curies per liter of air (pCi/L). In 44 other counties, more than 20% of homes contain elevated levels. The national average is 1 in 15, or roughly 7%, of homes contain elevated levels.

The Kentucky Association of Radon Professionals (KARP) announced today that information obtained from the public website, radon.com, indicates many homes in Kentucky contain radon levels in excess of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) action level of 4 pico curies per liter of air (pCi/L). In 13 counties, more than 50% of homes contain elevated radon levels. In 44 counties, more than 20% of homes contain elevated levels. The national average is 1 in 15, or roughly 7%, of homes contain elevated levels.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless radioactive gas that derives from the radioactive decay of naturally occurring uranium in the soil. The gas enters homes and other buildings through cracks in the foundation, sump pumps and soil in crawlspace areas. The EPA has determined that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, next to smoking, and the leading cause among non-smokers. The US Surgeon General and National Academy of Sciences estimate that 21,000 radon-related lung cancer deaths occur in the United States each year.

"With Kentucky leading the country in lung cancer incidents, we see radon as a serious public safety issue that isn't getting the attention it deserves," says Kyle Hoylman, KARP President. "Our organization continues to work with the state radon office to promote consumer awareness, but more needs to be done," Hoylman continues.

The only way to know if a home contains elevated radon levels is to have it tested. Testing is easy and affordable. If a home is found to have a radon problem, fixing it is fairly simple and cost-effective. In fact, most radon problems can be fixed for a cost similar to that of many common home repairs, averaging $1,000 to $2,500.

"Our department numbers indicate an average of 47% of all homes in the Commonwealth contain elevated radon levels," says Clay Hardwick of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services. "We join KARP in urging Kentucky families to test their homes for radon, and fix problems when found," adds Hardwick.

About KARP

The Kentucky Association of Radon Professionals is an organization consisting of responsible members of the radon testing, mitigation and laboratory analysis industries. Additional information about the organization can be found at: KentuckyRadon.org.

Radon Testing Results Information

Counties with elevated radon levels found in more than 50% of homes:

Clinton (50%) Estill (50%) Fayette (56%) Hart (71%) Jefferson (51%) Marion (58%) Meade (62%) Menifee (50%) Nelson (54%) Scott (59%) Warren (66%) Wayne (58%) Woodford (55%)

Counties with elevated radon levels found in more than 20% of homes:

Barren (35%) Boone (26%) Bourbon (40%) Boyd (28%) Boyle (41%) Breckenridge (33%) Bullitt (45%) Caldwell (28%) Casey (23%) Christian (40%) Clark (24%) Cumberland (35%) Floyd (28%) Franklin (34%) Garrard (20%) Green (37%) Greenup (32%) Hancock (21%) Hardin (48%) Harlan (22%) Harrison (28%) Hopkins (25%) Jessamine (43%) Larue (39%) Laurel (29%) Lawrence (20%) Lee (33%) Lewis (38%) Lincoln (39%) Logan (38%) Madison (34%) Mercer (35%) Metcalfe (20%) Monroe (29%) Montgomery (40%) Oldham (34%) Perry (25%) Powell (24%) Pulaski (48%) Rockcastle (33%) Shelby (24%) Simpson (27%) Taylor (42%) Todd (25%)

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