What's in a Name? Expensive Car Insurance if You're a James or Daniel, Says Confused.com

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Will Thomas advises parents after recent statistics obtained by the the comparison website.

James' are the most reckless drivers.

While nobody is perfect - not even Alfies - we would advise our customers to take more care when driving. Planning your route, allowing extra time and taking into consideration elements such as the great British weather, should result in less accidents and a reduction in convictions.

James and Daniel may be two of the top ten most popular boy's names for babies, but parents should be warned that when their sons grow up, they could be among some of the most reckless drivers on Britain's roads, says insurance and energy comparison website Confused.com!

James' are the most reckless drivers, with a shocking one in three (31%) admitting to having driving convictions, compared with nearly 1 in 5 (18%) Daniels. Alfies - the fifth-ranked most popular name - are the most vigilant drivers, with a mere 0.03% claiming to have convictions.

Girls appear to be altogether more careful, although Lucys - the tenth most popular girl's name - are the most reckless, with 6% having been on the wrong side of driving laws.

Charlotte Church has little to worry about when it comes to rocketing car insurance premiums as her toddler, Ruby, is likely to be almost whiter than white on the roads when she is older; in fact, a mere 0.11% of Rubys have driving convictions. However, new arrival Dexter could be a different story, with more than 1 in 10 (12%) Dexters listed as having driving convictions.

Will Thomas, head of motor insurance at Confused.com, said:
"Although women fared significantly better than the men in this research, it is difficult to get past the fact that one third of all James', or 2% of all drivers, have driving convictions. Not only does dangerous and careless driving have safety implications, but gaining points on driving licences also has a detrimental effect on insurance premiums. On average, a driver with three points will see premiums leap 7%, rising to 25% for six points and 50% for nine points; and the number of insurance providers willing to insure a driver with nine points can halve.

"While nobody is perfect - not even Alfies - we would advise our customers to take more care when driving. Planning your route, allowing extra time and taking into consideration elements such as the great British weather, should result in less accidents and a reduction in convictions."

For further information please contact:
Press office, Confused.com. 02920 434 398
Joanna Harte/ Karen Wagg, Polhill Communications. 020 7655 0550

About Confused.com:
Confused.com is one of the UK's biggest and most popular price comparison services. Launched in 2002, it generates over one million quotes per month. It has expanded its range of comparison products over the last couple of years to include home insurance, travel insurance, pet insurance, van insurance, motorbike insurance, breakdown cover and energy, as well as financial services products including credit cards, loans, mortgages and life insurance.

Confused.com has a panel of 81 motor insurers, its typical customer saves up £208* on their annual car insurance policy.

Confused.com is not a supplier, insurance company or broker. It provides a free, objective and unbiased comparison service. By using cutting-edge technology, it has developed a series of intelligent web-based solutions that evaluate a number of risk factors to help customers with their decision-making, subsequently finding them great deals on a wide-range of insurance products, financial services, utilities and more. Confused.com's service is based on the most up-to-date information provided by UK suppliers and industry regulators.

Confused.com is owned by the Admiral Group plc. Admiral listed on the London Stock Exchange in September 2004. Confused.com is regulated by the FSA.

*Based on the average customer savings made between January and July 2008

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Caroline Spindlove
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