Local Contractor Becomes First Certified Heater Mason in Kansas City Area

Share Article

Gene Padgitt, a local chimney and fireplace contractor recently became the first Certified Heater Mason in the Greater Kansas City Area.

Brick masonry heater

There is no limit to how the finished heater will look, using materials such as granite, soapstone, brick, and tile. I can help the customer through the design process and determine the correct size heater for the house, the best location, and the finished look based on their budget.

Masonry Heaters are becoming more popular as homeowners look for ways to use wood as a renewable energy for home heating, so local chimney and fireplace contractor, Gene Padgitt, decided to learn how to build heaters. It took Padgitt five years to complete all of the necessary requirements and learn from the masters who belong to the Masonry Heater Association of North America. Padgitt, a master chimney builder, found that masonry heaters are some of the most complicated things he has attempted.

The interior structure of a heater with a fire chamber, smoke channels, and flue, is the most difficult part of construction. There are several designs such as the Swedish contraflow, Finnish, Russian, Austrian, and others that are all built differently. Padgitt says "This is old world technology at its best, but you need training to do it right, A person can't just say they want to build a masonry heater and do it. There is a lot of study involved."

The most rewarding part of being a masonry heater builder is when the homeowner uses the heater for the first time and realizes how enjoyable heating their entire house can be. Masonry heaters have the ability to heat up to 3,000 sq. feet of living space if the home is planned right. The appliance uses a small amount of wood that only needs to be replaced every 12 hours, and they burn cleanly and efficiently without the use of electricity, gas, or ductwork.

Homeowners appreciate the fact that noisy fans are not necessary to heat their home and that wood is usually a readily available and less expensive source of fuel. Radiant heat from the large mass of masonry required for a masonry heater has been found to be beneficial for people who suffer from Arthritis and Fibromyalgia, penetrating deep into the body. Some green home builders are now using masonry heaters as the only source of heat in their homes.

Options to add to a masonry heater include an indoor bake oven, wood storage bin, heated bench, hot water heater, mantels and shelves. Gene states "There is no limit to how the finished heater will look, using materials such as granite, soapstone, brick, and tile. I can help the customer through the design process and determine the correct size heater for the house, the best location, and the finished look based on their budget. " Most heaters cost between $10,000 and $30,000, with price determined by materials and size of the heater.

To see Gene Padgitt's work visit http://www.chimkc.com. To see more about masonry heaters visit http://www.mha-net.org. Padgitt will have a masonry heater on display in his booth at the Remodeling Show at the American Royal Arena February 6 -8, 2009. Gene and Marge Padgitt have owned Padgitt Chimney & Fireplace, a chimney maintence/inspection company and HearthMasters, a chimney and fireplace building and restoration company since 1982. They are the largest chimney contractor in the Midwest.

Please contact Marge Padgitt at 816-461-3665 for more information.
HearthMasters
1134 S Pearl St.
Independence, MO 64050

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Marge Padgitt
Visit website