Study Demonstrates In-Dwelling Catheters for Pain Control in Plastic Surgery Post-Op Patients Works

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New Hampshire Plastic Surgeon Provides Breast Implant Patients More Control Over Their Post-Op Pain

Bolus instillation of a long-acting anesthetic into the dissected implant pocket following augmentation mammaplasty allows the patient to have control over her post-op pain, and can be used in association with other analgesics

New Hampshire Plastic Surgeon Dr. Peter Pacik just completed a 12-year study involving 687 consecutive patients, which demonstrates the effectiveness of in-dwelling catheters for post-op pain control for patients who had breast enlargement surgery.

The results of the study were just published in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal, Vol 28, No 6, November/December 2008, entitled, "Pain Control in Augmentation Mammaplasty Using In-dwelling Catheters in 687 Consecutive Patients: Data Analysis."

In the study, Dr. Pacik describes the use of pain control catheters to help control post-operative pain in augmentation mammaplasty patients. The results showed that by instilling a long-acting anesthetic into the augmentation mammaplasty breast pocket for controlling post-op pain, that it was as effective as narcotics.

An analysis of the data revealed that female patients experienced multiple areas of pain after breast enlargement plastic surgery, such as the sternum (breast bone,) sides of the chest, below the collar bones (clavicle) and back pain, in addition to the expected breast pain. Older women experienced less pain and frightened patients reported more pain and used narcotics for a longer period of time. Otherwise, there were no statistical differences as related to the size of the breast implants, intra-operative expansion, handedness, the duration of surgery and the different techniques of dissection to create the implant pocket.

Dr. Pacik noted that this study appears to be the largest published study using in-dwelling catheters to control post-operative pain in breast enlargement surgery. "Bolus instillation of a long-acting anesthetic into the dissected implant pocket following augmentation mammaplasty allows the patient to have control over her post-op pain, and can be used in association with other analgesics," he said.

"Patients have been very grateful for this added form of pain control and are able to have less fear going into the plastic surgery, knowing that everything possible will be done to help keep them comfortable after their surgery," Dr. Pacik added.

To learn more about the study, go to Pain Control in Augmentation Mammaplasty

About the Plastic Surgery Center:
Founded in 1972 by Peter T. Pacik, MD, FACS, the Plastic Surgery Center in Manchester, New Hampshire, has been providing state-of-the-art cosmetic surgery to patients in New England, especially New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maine and Vermont. He has helped 1000s of patients diminish physical imperfections and feel beautiful and confident in just a few short months after plastic surgery.

In addition to breast enlargements, the Plastic Surgery Center offers breast lifts, breast reductions, body contouring - reconstruction after massive weight loss, facelifts, fat grafting, liposuction, rhinoplasty, and tummy tucks, as well as facial rejuvenation procedures, including advanced skincare, chemical peels, dermabrasion, laser skin surfacing, the Obagi Blue PeelTM, Botox®, the treatment of vaginismus, and facial fillers (injectables) such as Juvederm®, Restylane® and Radiesse®.

For More Information, Contact:
Janet Pacik
The Plastic Surgery Center
http://www.plasticsurgerypa.com
800-640-0290

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