Study Reveals LNG is the Cleaner Fuel Choice LNG's Lifecycle Emissions Cleaner than Most Advanced Coal Technologies

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The Center for Liquefied Natural Gas (CLNG) has released an independent study which quantifies the greenhouse gas emissions released through the lifecycle of electricity production supplied by liquefied natural gas (LNG) and domestic coal. The study, performed by PACE Global Energy Services, reveals that existing U.S. coal fired power generation produces two and a half times (161%) more greenhouse gas emissions than LNG fueled power generation.

LNG will clearly play a crucial role in helping to meet the substantial increase in demand for clean burning natural gas once climate change legislation becomes a reality.

The Center for Liquefied Natural Gas (CLNG) has released an independent study which quantifies the greenhouse gas emissions released through the lifecycle of electricity production supplied by liquefied natural gas (LNG) and domestic coal. The study, performed by PACE Global Energy Services, reveals that existing U.S. coal fired power generation produces two and a half times (161%) more greenhouse gas emissions than LNG fueled power generation.

"As Congress works to pass climate change legislation in the coming months in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, it is important that they know the truth about LNG's contribution to a cleaner environment," said CLNG president, Bill Cooper. "Our study has found that LNG fueled power generation produces 70 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions on a lifecycle basis than even the cleanest coal technologies."

"Replacing just one coal plant with LNG fueled power generation for one year would equate to removing 557,000 cars off the roads," said Cooper. "LNG will clearly play a crucial role in helping to meet the substantial increase in demand for clean burning natural gas once climate change legislation becomes a reality."

The PACE study provides a transparent "apples to apples" comparison of the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions attributable to LNG and coal. The analysis uses a representative average of typical U.S. LNG and coal operations used for generation of electricity. This includes a natural gas power plant supplied by LNG, a current U.S. coal fired power plant, and two separate advanced coal technologies not yet commercially viable in the U.S --- Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Advanced Ultra Super Critical Coal (SCPC).

The PACE study found that existing domestic coal power plants produce two and half --- or 161 percent --- more greenhouse gas emissions on a lifecycle basis than LNG fueled power plants. Even coal technologies that are considered cleaner, IGCC and SCPC, were found to produce 70 percent more lifecycle emissions than LNG. End-use fuel combustion produces the large majority of the total lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions for all cases. Emissions from fuel extraction, processing, and transportation are minimal in comparison to the emissions produced from combustion for all scenarios assessed.

For a copy of the complete study, visit the Center for Liquefied Natural Gas website at http://www.lngfacts.org/LNG-Research.

CLNG is a trade association of LNG producers, shippers, terminal operators and developers, energy trade associations and natural gas consumers. Its goal is to enhance public education and understanding about LNG by serving as a clearinghouse for LNG information. For more information, visit http://www.lngfacts.org

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Mary Ellen Grant
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