Hiring the Right Movers in New Jersey Can Save You from Scams and Unforeseen Costs; Lowy's Offers Tips to Avoid Making a Poor Choice

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As with any industry, there are always bad eggs out there that can hurt the reputation of everyone. When it comes to moving, some of the best moving companies in New Jersey have to deal with the many fly by night movers that scam or rip off customers on a daily basis. As with any service business, it is important to be careful and know the caveats of the business.

Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move.

As with any industry, there are always bad eggs out there that can hurt the reputation of everyone. When it comes to moving, some of the best moving companies in New Jersey have to deal with the many fly by night movers that scam or rip off customers on a daily basis. As with any service business, it is important to be careful and know the caveats of the business. With moving companies, though the price may be a little higher for a solid, reputable business, these companies are the ones you can most often trust will take care of you and will help you avoid high costs and add-ons in the long run. If a moving company has been established in an area for a long time, you can get more information on their history and how they run their business. Lowy's, a successful moving company in Neptune for over 85 years, offers some tips for movers to make sure you don't get taken.

1. Shop around. Be wary of any company offering prices significantly lower than competitors. Though online estimates can be helpful, get some in person estimates. They are often more accurate and can give you a "feel" for the way the company operates. Federal regulations require a moving company to do in-person estimates for all jobs within 50 miles. Chances are that name-brand movers will have an office near you.

2. Check on history. Check on them at the Better Business Bureau. A company with no history is a red flag. NJ Moving Companies that have a long history in the area tend to be more trustworthy.

3. Know your rights. Two sites that do a great job of laying it all out: http://www.protectyourmove.gov and http://www.moverescue.com. By the way, your mover should give you a copy of the federal handbook, "Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move." If don't get one, that's a red flag.

4. Understand the contract. Are there extra fees for things you thought were included? What are the company definitions for standard terms like a "flight of stairs"? What insurance is being offered? Is it a binding or nonbinding contract? If it's binding, the price is set. If it's nonbinding, you are responsible for all extra fees that are incurred.

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Stephan Lowy
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