Special Guest Suzanne Somers Encourages Wellness at Parker Seminars

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Actress, author, and celebrity Suzanne Somers is one of wellness' biggest supporters, and she stopped by the 2009 Las Vegas Parker Seminar to share her stories and show her support to the health care professionals who are working to make chiropractic wellness and natural lifestyles the popular choice among the public, which is proving a difficult task. As an advocate for wellness, Somers recognizes that in the United States, we don't have health care; we have disease care. Instead, she suggests, we should be treating patients using nature's tools. However, the allopathic model of medicine is so deeply engrained in society, and Americans have become so accustomed to the taste of chemicals in their food, they actually prefer it.

Actress, author, and celebrity Suzanne Somers is one of wellness' biggest supporters, and she stopped by the 2009 Las Vegas Parker Seminar to share her stories and show her support to the health care professionals who are working to make chiropractic wellness and natural lifestyles the popular choice among the public, which is proving a difficult task.

"I'm excited to talk to all of you today because I know you get called quacks too," said Somers. "Why are we called quacks because we choose to live drug free lifestyles?"

As an advocate for wellness, Somers recognizes that in the United States, we don't have health care; we have disease care. Instead, she suggests, we should be treating patients using nature's tools. However, the allopathic model of medicine is so deeply engrained in society, and Americans have become so accustomed to the taste of chemicals in their food, they actually prefer it.

"It's so difficult to find your way up to the top without [drugs and chemicals]," said Somers. "It took a bit of work for me to get to this point…but for the first time in my life I'm balanced."

Somers is well known for her work as an actress and her bevy of weight loss books and has recently received widespread attention for her exploration of natural hormone replacement therapy. "The biggest thing of all is hormones," she said. "They are the juice of youth for all of us. But we are draining out younger and younger."

Doctors are quick to prescribe what Somers calls the "menopausal cocktail" to women, a plethora of synthetic hormones, which aren't a substitute for the natural hormones women lack. "When I was menopausal without hormones, I wasn't too happy," she said. "That's why menopausal women get that reputation. They're suffering!"

Instead, she encouraged the audience to seek out natural alternatives and focus on wellness--diet, exercise, sleep, and mental health--as ways to overcome the challenges of aging. "We can live this long and be healthy," she said. Eat real food; organic. Load up on antioxidants. Look to nature for flavor: turmeric, cayenne, thyme, basil, rosemary. Take fish oils. Sleep eight to nine hours a night. "There is a whole new world out there. If we all found out how good we could feel on non-drugs, well we wouldn't need drugs," said Somers.

"I'm a big believer in chiropractic," said Somers. "I am just a filter for all the work you all are doing. You're in the trenches. You can save [people]."

For her service to the advancement of health, wellness, and humanity, Parker Seminars presented Suzanne Somers with the prestigious Back Bone Award. "Susanne has promoted a drug free world and has encouraged wellness for many years," said Dr. Fabrizio Mancini, president of Parker College of Chiropractic. "She has been an inspiration to so many people by engaging in natural behaviors and taking responsibility for her health."

"The most rewarding part of my career has been my work with health care," said Somers. "Thank you for the work that you all do. This award really means a lot to me, and I am honored."

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Stacey Kjerstad
Parker Semiars
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