Dr. John Gray Explains 'Why Mars and Venus Collide'

Share Article

Relationship expert and best-selling author Dr. John Gray traveled to Parker Seminars Las Vegas and exposed the fundamental differences between men and women and provided valuable advice on how to cultivate better relationships--both personal and professional--between genders. The first step towards reaching a state of harmony, according to Gray, is to adopt a healthy lifestyle.

Relationship expert and best-selling author Dr. John Gray traveled to Parker Seminars Las Vegas and exposed the fundamental differences between men and women and provided valuable advice on how to cultivate better relationships--both personal and professional--between genders. The first step towards reaching a state of harmony, according to Gray, is to adopt a healthy lifestyle.

"John Gray has recognized there is no way to have a true, authentic, and deep relationship unless you have good health," said Dr. Fabrizio Mancini, president of Parker College of Chiropractic. "He is a big supporter of our profession and always mentions the importance of chiropractic care."

Gray insists the body has the potential for complete health and natural, healthy aging, but unfortunately people focus on prescription drugs and end up only seeing failed medicine. "People are hungry for something that empowers them and makes sense," said Gray. "Inspire them that they are in charge of their own health."

While most people already know they need to have good diet and exercise habits, fewer know they need to also consider stress as a strong influence on their overall health. Stress is not just a mental health issue; it also takes a toll on the physical body, producing the hormone cortisol, which increases blood pressure and blood sugar and reduces immune response. Stress is the one factor that has been linked to every sickness. So it's no wonder why in today's stressed-out world, people are unhealthier than ever.

Relationships are among the top causes of stress, but they can also be a new environment to fix the stress--if men and women learn how to relate to one another. There are physical explanations for the reasons why men and women react differently to stress. When describing themselves under moderate stress, women experience eight times the blood flow to the emotional side of the brain, whereas there is no emotional activity going on in a man's brain. "Women are not overreacting. They are having a normal reaction," said Gray. "And it's not that men don't care. Men only register to big stress."

One way to combat stress for a woman is to stimulate the production of oxytocin, a hormone proven to lower their stress. "Whenever a man does something romantic--it doesn't matter if it's big or small--it stimulates oxytocin," said Gray. "Men make the mistake of doing big stuff thinking it's going to last a long time. That's why they end up feeling like whatever they do, it doesn't seem to be enough."

Talking about problems is another big oxytocin producer in women, which may lower their stress, but can do just the opposite for men. "Men need to fix things, solve problems, and feel important," said Gray, which increases their testosterone--the hormone that lowers cortisol levels. "The bigger the problem, the more testosterone." However, 90 percent of the things women talk about have no solution. Men think if there's nothing they can do and no way to solve the problem, then why talk about it?

By recognizing these biological differences and making an effort to be more understanding, men and women have the potential to reduce their own stress and help relieve the stress of their counterparts.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Stacey Kjerstad
Parker Seminars
972-438-6932 (7805)
Email >

Kerri Kossick
Visit website