How to Cope With Having a Heavier Workload Revealed by Hale Dwoskin, Featured Teacher in "The Secret"

Share Article

Hale Dwoskin, featured teacher in "The Secret" and author of the New York Times best seller "The Sedona Method," reveals how to cope with having a heavier workload, an issue many people are now facing in the current economy as layoffs continue to increase.

No matter how large your workload -- even if you're the world's best multi-tasker -- remember you can actually only do one thing at a time. And the reason we struggle when our workload increases is because we resist the increase

Hale Dwoskin, featured teacher in "The Secret" and author of the New York Times best seller "The Sedona Method," reveals how to cope with having a heavier workload, an issue many people are now facing in the current economy as layoffs continue to increase.

In February 2009, 651,000 Americans lost their jobs, and Standard & Poor is predicting another 2 million job losses by the fall. What this means for those fortunate enough to still be working is a much heavier workload.

Simply put, companies are operating with fewer employees, but they don't want business to slow down. Many workers are now doing the jobs of two or more people, and struggling to do them well enough to avoid the next round of layoffs.

Many more have taken to working overtime or on the weekends just to keep up. And as for taking vacations, even those who can still afford it may be afraid they won't have a job anymore when they return.

The end result? Increased stress and anxiety, which takes its toll on everything from health to your productivity.

"Research shows that increased workloads and time demands are huge in terms of stress on the employee, and stress has many negative effects on just about any health condition," Leah Van Ooyen, manager of workplace health and wellness for Connex Health in Burlington, Ontario told The Globe and Mail. "Even just experiencing stress can drive productivity down if people feel overwhelmed."

Working long hours increases the risk of illness and injury, no matter what someone's job is, found a study published in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. After analyzing over 100,000 job records from close to 11,000 workers, researchers found those who routinely put in long days or worked overtime were at an increased risk of:

  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Chronic infections
  • General health complaints
  • Death

Overall, the more hours a person works, the greater the risks. The study found employees who worked overtime were 61 percent more likely to have a work-related injury or illness than those who did not.

With the worst economy in decades, and heavier workloads becoming a way of life for many, people may have no choice but to grin and bear it. On a practical level, figuring out how to prioritize tasks, and delegate as much as possible, will be invaluable, as will learning how to avoid distractions and time wasters.

At the same time, dealing with the resulting emotions may be the most important piece of the puzzle, because if someone becomes overwhelmed by stress their health and productivity will plummet.

"No matter how large your workload -- even if you're the world's best multi-tasker -- remember you can actually only do one thing at a time. And the reason we struggle when our workload increases is because we resist the increase," says Hale Dwoskin, CEO and director of training of Sedona Training Associates.

In fact, the resistance people may feel toward doing extra work may very well be eating up much of their mental and physical energy. For instance, someone may dread going to work, and think about it even when they're at home. They may sit at their desk at work mulling over how they will never be able to complete all their work.

By resisting in this way, people are focusing their mind on what they don't want: more work. If people were to instead focus on the task at hand, and stay in the present moment, they would find that the work gets done with much less mental strife. Often this requires first letting go of resistance using The Sedona Method.

"If you're willing to simply allow yourself to let go of the feeling of resistance, you'll find that you can get more done with less effort," Dwoskin says. "This does not mean that you should accept a workload that isn't right for you. It only means that if you're willing to release you do not need to be overwhelmed or stressed by your workload."

Further, when people get home from a hard day's work, the last thing on their mind should be that very work. So the most important thing they can do is take advantage of releasing after the workday to really clear the mind and feel at peace.

"The most powerful way to relax after work is to allow yourself to take a few minutes and release any disappointment, stress, tension, worry or anger you have from your day," Dwoskin says. "If you're simply willing to release after your workday, you'll find that you calm down very quickly and can easily have an enjoyable evening."

For those who are new to The Sedona Method, they can listen
free right now to a powerful new introductory release: http://www.sedona.com/html/money-release.aspx

This previously unpublished recording was made by Hale Dwoskin at one of his recent 7-Day Retreats and is a must-listen for anyone experiencing any type of fear and anxiety in relation to this economy.

For more insights on the topic of releasing, go to http://www.Sedona.com.

Please also note that Hale Dwoskin, New York Times Best-Selling author of "The Sedona Method", featured expert in the film and New York Times bestseller "The Secret," and CEO and Director of Training of Sedona Training Associates, is available for interviews.

Sedona Training Associates is an organization that teaches courses based on the emotional releasing techniques originated by Hale Dwoskin's mentor, Lester Levenson. Dwoskin is an international speaker and featured faculty member at Esalen and the Omega Institute. For over a quarter century, he has regularly been teaching The Sedona Method techniques to individuals and corporations throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Visit http://www.Sedona.com.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

HALE DWOSKIN
Visit website