Most IVF Patients Under 35 Should Have Single Embryo Transfer, According to Latest SART Data

Delaware Fertility Doctors Urge Worldwide Acceptance

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SART makes it a point of calculating and listing the implantation rate in each age group, which really gives an indication of the health and viability of each embryo created in the lab.

Newark, DE (PRWEB) March 17, 2009

IVF physicians at Reproductive Associates of Delaware (RAD)(http://www.reproductiveassociates.org) have demonstrated that single embryos cultured under proper conditions have more than a 50% chance of implanting and developing successfully in women under age 35. In national results recently released and published online by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART.org), the Delaware center found that in 2007, 55.1% of women under 35 achieved a live born pregnancy after embryo transfer, utilizing an average of just 1.4 embryos. During that same year, national averages for women under age 35 were 46.1% live births per transfer utilizing a much higher average of 2.2 embryos. In stark contrast to the national averages, RAD performed single embryo transfers in 57.3% of these women, compared to the national average of just 4.5%.

"The key parameter everyone needs to look at is the implantation rate," stated Dr. Ronald F. Feinberg, IVF Medical Director at RAD. "SART makes it a point of calculating and listing the implantation rate in each age group, which really gives an indication of the health and viability of each embryo created in the lab." In 2007, RAD achieved an implantation rate of 51.2% for women under 35, compared to the national average of 32.6%.

Dr. Feinberg attributes higher implantation and live birth rates at the Delaware center to two key factors: 1) Adherence to strict laboratory protocols which allow for the culture of embryos to the blastocyst stage, thus permitting careful embryo selection; and 2) Evaluation and treatment of patients for underlying infertility problems prior to IVF. "Blastocysts are also able to be preserved in a frozen state for future use," noted Dr. Feinberg. "And we believe that the single embryo transfer approach is also highly effective for thawed embryos, as shown with our pregnancy and implantation rates utilizing these embryos."

"Interestingly, we have found that the majority of our patients with infertility don't necessarily require IVF," noted Dr. Barbara A. McGuirk, Director of Reproductive Surgery at RAD. "Through appropriate use of minimally-invasive restorative surgery, about 60% of our patients can achieve normal pregnancy without IVF. However, when it becomes clear that IVF would be beneficial, prior treatment seems to dramatically help the implantation process." Through this approach, RAD clinicians evaluate and successfully treat many women who have failed IVF at other centers. They also believe this combined approach to restorative surgery and single embryo IVF transfer is highly cost-effective.

The doctors at RAD urge other fertility and IVF centers worldwide to adopt strategies similar to theirs, which would result in more successful and lower risk fertility care. "Education of our community physicians and doctors-in-training should go a long way towards improving the safety and effectiveness of fertility care," noted Dr. George Kovalevsky, Director of Academic Affairs at RAD. "Our significant reduction in multiple pregnancies is greatly appreciated by our community and insurers, and has resulted in improved pregnancy outcomes." In 2007, RAD IVF treatment resulted in 18.4% twins and no triplets, compared to the national average of 32.9% twins and 1.8% triplets for women under 35.

Contact:
Nadine M. Shaw
Phone: (302) 623-4274
Fax: (302) 623-4269
nshaw(at)reproductiveassociates.org

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