Feeling Alienated: What to Do When It Feels There is No One to Turn To, Revealed by Hale Dwoskin, Featured Teacher in 'The Secret'

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Hale Dwoskin, featured teacher in "The Secret" and author of the New York Times best seller "The Sedona Method," reveals what those who feel like they are alienated and have no one to turn to should do to overcome the situation.

Sometimes support appears to come from outside, but it is always available from inside.

Hale Dwoskin, featured teacher in "The Secret" and author of the New York Times best seller "The Sedona Method," reveals what those who feel like they are alienated and have no one to turn to should do to overcome the situation.

Recently impeached Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich is at the heart of one of the biggest scandals to face U.S. politics in some time, and is most certainly feeling alienated from those around him -- to a degree most people will never experience. Whether or not he "deserved it" aside, what would it be like to be in his shoes (or in the shoes of any other celebrity or politician embroiled in a very public scandal)?

In the case of public figures, it may actually be that a large number of people have "turned against" them or are keeping their distance. But for the rest of people, this sense of alienation, though not as widespread on a public level, can still feel just as severe.

Feeling alienated invokes powerful feelings of isolation and loneliness. It can stem from many different circumstances, such as not getting along with co-workers, experiencing a death in the family, or undergoing any type of tragedy. People can also experience alienation if they are engaging in behaviors that don't mesh with their values, such as working in a corporate setting when they would rather be a poet.

Even entire groups of people can feel alienated from society as a whole because of their ethnicity, religion or sexual orientation.

Unfortunately, once feelings of estrangement begin, people may find they linger, until no matter what course they take in life they still don't feel like they fit in, or like they're fully loved. This is why, for those feeling alienated, it's important to realize that things can be changed for the better.

"When you feel alienated you make it so," says Hale Dwoskin, CEO and director of training of Sedona Training Associates. "The more alienated you feel the more you reinforce and feed that feeling and all actions that flow from that feeling."

Whether people realize it consciously or not, their thoughts and feelings directly influence and even dictate their actions. So the more a person focuses on the feelings of hostility, isolation or unfriendliness in life, the more they will be a part of their reality. On the flip side, people can instead choose to let those feelings go using a simple but powerful tool called The Sedona Method.

"If you're feeling alienated, like an outcast or like you have no one to turn to, remember it's just a feeling. If you release the feeling of being alone you'll discover that you are never alone; there is always support," Dwoskin says. "Sometimes support appears to come from outside, but it is always available from inside."

So no matter what circumstances are causing someone to feel alienated, if they release this feeling the experience itself will also disappear. At the same time, the more people involve other people in their life -- in both the good times and bad -- the easier it will be for them to feel like they're a part of something.

"You can allow yourself to reach out to others and find small ways to support them," Dwoskin says. "This may seem backwards, however the more you reach out to support your fellow man or woman, the less isolated you feel. Ultimately, as long as you believe you're a separate individual there will always be some feeling of loneliness or isolation. The best way to deal with this is to discover the truth of who you are, and realize that you are not separate from those around you."

Right now everyone can get a free Insiders Guide to The Sedona Method email course sampler by inputting just their name and email in the sidebar on the right of the article at http://www.sedona.com/feeling-alienated.aspx .

For more insights on the topic of releasing, Hale Dwoskin, New York Times Best-Selling author of "The Sedona Method", featured expert in the film and New York Times bestseller "The Secret," and CEO and Director of Training of Sedona Training Associates, is available for interviews.

Sedona Training Associates is an organization that teaches courses based on the emotional releasing techniques originated by Hale Dwoskin's mentor, Lester Levenson. Dwoskin is an international speaker and featured faculty member at Esalen and the Omega Institute. For over a quarter century, he has regularly been teaching The Sedona Method techniques to individuals and corporations throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Visit http://www.Sedona.com.

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