British Consulate-General Boston and Harvard Kennedy School Contribute to International Institution Reform Debate Ahead of the April G20 Summit

Share Article

Following Prime Minister Gordon Brown's visit to Harvard's Kennedy School of Government in April 2008, the British Consulate-General in Boston engaged with a number of Harvard professors to examine current global issues and the necessary international institution reform required to tackle them.

From climate change and environmental degradation to nuclear proliferation and states in crisis, the challenges we face are many, and we have both an obligation and an opportunity to confront them

Following Prime Minister Gordon Brown's visit to Harvard's Kennedy School of Government in April 2008, the British Consulate-General in Boston engaged with a number of Harvard professors to examine current global issues and the necessary international institution reform required to tackle them. "From climate change and environmental degradation to nuclear proliferation and states in crisis, the challenges we face are many, and we have both an obligation and an opportunity to confront them," said Melodie Jackson, Associate Dean for Communications & Public Affairs at Harvard University. Their contributions, summarized below, have been posted on the official London Summit webpage.

"We are pleased that our mission at Harvard Kennedy School relates to the work being done in London and throughout the world as the G20 summit approaches," Jackson continued.

Dr Phil Budden, Consul General at the British Consulate in Boston, said that the partnership with Harvard has enabled US thinking to feed directly into the debate ahead of the landmark 'London Summit' in April. "The British Consulate General in Boston is well-placed to help connect our counterparts in the UK with the renowned intellectual capital that exists at Harvard," Dr Budden said. "A variety of opinion from centres of excellence like Harvard can help shape necessary international institution reform to meet our world's future challenges and goals."

Summaries and links to the full bodies of work are listed below. For more information, visit the British Consulate-General Boston homepage

Monica Duffy Toft: Financial Insecurity and Global Conflict: What are the connections between the global financial crisis and violent conflict? First, the crisis poses the chance of an increase in the number of new civil wars. Additionally, today's world leaders rightly hold in the forefront of their minds the impact of the Great Depression on the political developments in Europe and the emergence of ideologies and foreign policies that led directly to the Second World War

Dr Robert C Stowe - Climate Change is the ultimate "global-commons" problem. Individuals, corporations, communities, and countries each use a common resource-the ability of the atmosphere to store greenhouse gases (GHGs). In fact, they over-use that resource, because the costs of doing so (associated with warming of the Earth's surface) do not accrue except to a trivial degree to those who emit the gases. Greenhouse gases mix uniformly in the upper atmosphere, and thus damages are completely independent of the location of emissions sources.

Dani Rodrik - Let developing nations rule: The global crisis is an opportunity for developing nations to project their interests in multilateral institutions, and gain influence in shaping economic globalisation. To make the best of this outcome, developing nations need a good sense of their interests and priorities, but also to recognize that having a greater say entails acceptance of greater responsibilities.

Dani Rodrik - One economics, many recipes: Dani Rodrik of the Harvard Kennedy School talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the role of institutions in economic development. They discuss the use of 'growth diagnostics' to identify the binding constraints on economic activity and hence the priorities for policy and institutional reform, drawing on Rodrik's experiences applying the framework to South Africa.

Jeffrey A. Frankel - several articles: Jeffrey is James W. Harpel Professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Matthew Campion
Visit website