Learn How to Parent Your Baby's DNA During Pregnancy

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If you are expecting a baby then you should consider yourself already a parent, according to Jeanette Bolvary author of the book Born Smart, Unlock The Potential In Your Baby's Genes. Soon after conception an unborn baby starts to map his epigenome, by switching genes in different cells on or off.

If you are expecting a baby then you should consider yourself already a parent, according to Jeanette Bolvary author of the book Born Smart, Unlock The Potential In Your Baby's Genes.

Soon after conception an unborn baby starts to map his epigenome, by switching genes in different cells on or off. Bolvary says, "Everything a pregnant mother eats, drinks, breathes and touches influences this process. We must now accept that parenting starts in the womb, with caring for your unborn baby's DNA."

Bolvary extensively researched the subject during the writing of her book and realised that whilst many people are aware of the importance of healthy foods during pregnancy, most are not aware of the importance of some foods for repairing damaged DNA.

"Every day environmental toxins, smoke or sun exposure can damage DNA in our bodies and it is very important for a pregnant mother to help her baby repair this damage by eating foods that strengthen DNA repair mechanisms." said Bolvary.

Fueled by the realisation that important discoveries in genetic research that can greatly benefit expecting parents and their babies are not readily published by the mainstream media, Jeanette launched the "Epigenome website for expecting mums and dads" http://www.bornsmart.com.au.

The difference between your genome and your epigenome is that whilst your genome is inherited from your parents, your epigenome is what makes you unique. Bolvary asks "If you and your brother or sister inherits the same genome from your parents, why don't you also look and think exactly the same?"

The simple answer to this question is that your genome is a template while your epigenome, mapped on this template during pregnancy, largely determine among many other things your health and intellectual outcome.

She says, "Surprisingly studies in the area of serious illnesses like cancer, Alzheimer's and many others have made extraordinary discoveries on how our genes work and what we can do to help a baby achieve the best possible genetic outcome."

With this website she hopes to make information on everything that influences a baby's genes readily available to expecting parents.

For further information, contact:
Jeanette Bolvary
Mob. 0434 612 859
website http://www.bornsmart.com.au

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