Hale Dwoskin, Featured in the Blockbuster 'The Secret,' Reveals How to Get Over Anger and Resentment in this Economy

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Hale Dwoskin, featured teacher in "The Secret" and author of the New York Times best seller "The Sedona Method," reveals how to get over anger and resentment in this economy -- and why doing so is crucial for health and success.

Even if your anger or resentment is justified, it is looking backwards as opposed to noticing what is actually here now and what you can do about it.

Hale Dwoskin, featured teacher in "The Secret" and author of the New York Times best seller "The Sedona Method," reveals how to get over anger and resentment in this economy -- and why doing so is crucial for health and success.

The economy is a touchy subject these days, almost as touchy as the topic of personal finances. Add the two together, and that is a surefire recipe for resentment that has clouded many Americans' thoughts.

In fact, late last year, in a survey by Decision Research, a think tank for risk assessment, 41 percent of 802 respondents said they were very angry about the current financial challenges, while 32 percent said they were moderately angry.

A similar number of people also reported feeling fearful, worried and sad about financial challenges, and 51 percent believed they had no or only slight influence for controlling the impacts of the economy on their lives.

Of course, resentment is a form of anger, so if someone is feeling angry, they are also feeling resentful. Aside from the unpleasantness that resentment brings up in people, why else should they want to get over resentment?

These thoughts put people's mind into a place of negative energy in which they:

  • May desire to strike out to hurt and stop others
  • Feel intense and explosive sensations
  • Have noisy, stubborn and obsessive thoughts
  • Think about how to "get even" or "make others pay"
  • Take destructive actions toward themselves and others around them

"When you feel anger and resentment you don't realize that you are holding in mind conflict and creating resistance," says Hale Dwoskin, CEO and director of training of Sedona Training Associates. "Even if your anger or resentment is justified, it is looking backwards as opposed to noticing what is actually here now and what you can do about it."

The more someone resents what's happening, the more stressed out they'll feel. And stress detracts from life, robs people of energy and damages health.

An American Psychological Association (APA) study actually found that 43 percent of all adults suffer adverse health effects from stress!

And while a person's health is suffering from fatigue, an impaired immune system, headaches and a myriad of other stress-related issues, their productivity goes down, along with their attitude.

It's next to impossible to think clearly and move ahead with life and career when the mind and body are encompassed in a cloud of negativity, so the more resentment someone feels, the more they can expect their health, success and their financial situation to decline.

And it doesn't matter if someone feels their resentment is justified.

"One of the places where we get stuck with resentment is believing that our anger is justified or we are right," Dwoskin says.

Someone may feel that they're right to be angry about being laid off, and now facing a home foreclosure as a result. Or they may not exactly be sure what they are angry about -- bankers, politicians, the AIG executives, they may all play a part -- but that person knows they're right in feeling this way.

"If you find yourself getting stuck in feeling right or justified, now is the time to ask yourself what's more important," Dwoskin says. "Would you rather be right or justified that you can't get what you want, or would you rather be more successful and achieve your goals?"

"If you'd rather be right," he continues, "then let go of wanting to be right. And if you'd rather be successful, you'll find that you naturally let go and see solutions where before you only saw problems."

When people use The Sedona Method, letting go of negative feelings like resentment and anger is easy. Letting go of negativity brings people to the peace that is their essence, and this peace has room for many seemingly 'different' opinions that are, in fact, all facets of the larger whole.

"So if you're feeling any anger or resentment about the economy in general or about what is happening to you financially, the best thing to do is allow yourself to welcome the anger and let it go," Dwoskin says.

Right now everyone can get a free Insiders Guide to The Sedona Method email course sampler by inputting just their name and email in the sidebar on the right of the article at http://www.sedona.com/getting-over-economy-resentment.aspx .

For more insights on the topic of releasing, Hale Dwoskin, New York Times Best-Selling author of "The Sedona Method", featured expert in the film and New York Times bestseller "The Secret," and CEO and Director of Training of Sedona Training Associates, is available for interviews.

Sedona Training Associates is an organization that teaches courses based on the emotional releasing techniques originated by Hale Dwoskin's mentor, Lester Levenson. Dwoskin is an international speaker and featured faculty member at Esalen and the Omega Institute. For over a quarter century, he has regularly been teaching The Sedona Method techniques to individuals and corporations throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Visit http://www.Sedona.com.

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