Electronics Recycling Volumes Climb 7% in 2008, According to Newly Published Index

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The National Center for Electronics Recycling has announced the publication of their 2008 per capita collection index (PCCI) for electronics recycling. The PCCI, an index measuring collection volumes of used electronic equipment in six ongoing electronics recycling programs, has shown an increase of 7% over 2007 numbers. A rising PCCI indicates an increase in the collection of e-waste across the programs included in the index and suggests a similar trend nation-wide.

Today at the ISRI Electronics Recycling SUMMIT®, the National Center for Electronics Recycling (NCER) announced the publication of their 2008 per capita collection index (PCCI) for electronics recycling. The PCCI is an index that measures collection volumes of used electronic equipment in six ongoing electronics recycling programs across the United States. Based on the NCER's data gathering and analysis, the 2008 PCCI value was 7% higher than in 2007.

"We have been gathering these numbers from the same collection programs for the last three years in order to measure the overall trends," said NCER Executive Director Jason Linnell. "As anyone who runs electronics collection programs will tell you, volumes are increasing. Our PCCI indicates a 23% increase in pounds collected from 2006 to 2008. This suggests that consumers with access to these recycling programs are participating in increasing numbers and volumes; and we expect to see these collection rates continue to increase as consumers become more aware of options for recycling electronics through industry voluntary and state-mandated programs."

A rising PCCI, such as this new 2008 number, indicates an increase in the collection of e-waste across the programs included in the index and suggests a similar trend nation-wide. The jurisdictions included in the index are the states of California, Maine, and Delaware; a large municipality in Hennepin County, Minnesota; and two smaller municipalities in Branford, Connecticut and Frederick County, Virginia. For a complete explanation of the assumptions and calculations behind the PCCI, see http://www.ecyclingresource.org/ContentPage.aspx?PageId=24.

In addition to the PCCI, the NCER, as the premier organization in the U.S. actively tracking and analyzing key data in this field, has recently published several new reports about the state of electronics recycling in the U.S. The reports are available on http://www.electronicsrecycling.org including:

•Maine 2008 E-waste Collection Overview Chart - based on information provided by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, this chart breaks down the percentage of monitors and televisions returned under the Maine law in several key categories. As in previous years, televisions represent the great majority - over 70% - of returned products. See: http://www.electronicsrecycling.org/public/UserDocuments/ME%20ewaste%20collection%20overview%20chart%201_1_08%20to%2012_31_08.xls
•Oregon State Contractor Program First Quarter 2009 Results - the NCER was selected in 2008 to administer the Oregon E-Cycles State Contractor Program (http://www.oregonecycles.com). NCER has developed an extensive collector network in the state and has collected 802,368 pounds of covered electronic devices in the first quarter of their program. Complete details and other updates on the State Contractor Program are found at http://www.electronicsrecycling.org/oregon.
•National Electronics Recycling Infrastructure Clearinghouse (NERIC) State Fee Analysis - through a joint project with the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), the NCER is provided several new analyses of the emerging state-based electronics recycling systems, such as registration fees and projected manufacturer compliance costs. See: http://www.ecyclingresource.org.
At the ISRI Electronics Recycling SUMMIT®, NCER Executive Director Jason Linnell moderated an expert panel on the issues and challenges associated with the new state electronics recycling laws. The NCER noted that 18 states one major city now have mandatory electronics recycling laws in place, equating to slightly over half of the U.S. population.

For additional information about the NCER and any of their research projects call 304-699-1008 or visit http://www.electronicsrecycling.org.

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