Clean Beach Council Releases Annual List of Clean and Healthy Beaches National Clean Beaches Week Promotes "Family Beach Safety"

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The Clean Beaches Council today released its annual list of beaches which have been officially certified as clean, healthy and environmentally well managed. This year beaches in twenty states and U.S. territories, including American Samoa, California, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin, are on the list.

Because of the recession, the summer travel season is expected to be lighter than it has been in recent years, according to the Travel Industry Association of America, but still beaches remain one of the most popular destinations

The Clean Beaches Council today released its annual list of beaches which have been officially certified as clean, healthy and environmentally well managed. The announcement was made as families and beach-lovers around the country prepare to flock to the beach for the July 4th weekend, the biggest beach-going weekend of the year.

This year beaches in twenty states and U.S. territories, including American Samoa, California, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin, are on the list. (See complete list below.)

"Because of the recession, the summer travel season is expected to be lighter than it has been in recent years, according to the Travel Industry Association of America, but still beaches remain one of the most popular destinations," stated Walter McLeod, President of the Clean Beaches Council. "Even though millions of Americans spend time at beaches, there is still no easy way to determine which are clean and well managed. We hope our program increases public awareness of our individual responsibility to keep beaches clean and safe."

This year's announcement coincides with National Clean Beaches Week (NCBW) held annually from July 1-7. This "Earth Day" for beaches has four main themes: environment, healthy seafood, sustainable travel, and fitness. Founded in 2004, NCBW has grown in mammoth proportion. More than fifty (50) coastal mayors and twenty-eight (28) coastal governors along with numerous counties have issued proclamations or resolutions endorsing the week. On Capitol Hill, the United States Senate and House of Representatives each unanimously passed Clean Beaches Week resolutions, and the U.S. President has traditionally honored the week.

The Blue Wave is the first environmental certification program for beaches in the U.S. Now in its tenth year, the program has been called the "LEEDS" certification for beaches. To become certified, beaches adhere to best management practices in the following areas: water quality, beach and intertidal conditions, hazards/safety, services, habitat conservation, erosion management, public information and education.

2009 BLUE WAVE BEACHES

American Samoa
Ofu Beach, National Park of American Samoa
Olosega Beach, National Park of American Samoa

California
Drakes Beach, Point Reyes National Seashore
Wildcat Beach, Point Reyes National Seashore
Limantour Beach, Point Reyes National Seashore
Crescent Beach, Redwood National Park
Gold Bluff Beach, Redwood National Park
Enderts Beach, Redwood National Park

Florida (South Atlantic)
Hollywood Beach
Dania Beach
Fort Lauderdale Beach
Pompano Beach
Deerfield Beach

Florida (Gulf Coast)
Venice Beach
Siesta Key Beach
Caspersen Beach
Lido Beach

Florida (North Atlantic)
Jacksonville Beach

Florida (Central Atlantic)
Jetty Park Beach

Florida (Pan Handle)
Inlet Beach
Rosemary Beach
Seacrest
Seagrove
Seaside
Watercolor
Grayton
Blue Mountain
Santa Rosa
Dune Allen
Sandestin
Seascape
Miramar
Alys Beach
DeerLake State Park    
Grayton Beach State Park
Topsail Hill State Preserve
Johnson Beach, Gulf Islands National Seashore

Hawaii
Keauhou Landing, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Halape Shelter, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Ka' aha Beach, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Indiana
Kemil Beach, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore
Lake View Beach, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore
Mount Baldy Beach, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore
West Beach, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

Maryland
North Ocean Beach, Assateague Island National Seashore

Maine
Sand Beach, Acadia National Park
Echo Beach, Acadia National Park

Massachusetts
Coast Guard Beach, Cape Cod National Seashore
Herring Cove Beach, Cape Cod National Seashore
Marconi Beach, Cape Cod National Seashore
Nauset Light Beach, Cape Cod National Seashore
Race Point Beach, Cape Cod National Seashore

Michigan
Pere Marquette Beach
Esch Beach, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore
South Manitou Island, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore
Sand Pont Beach, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Mississippi
West Ship Island Beach, Gulf Islands National Seashore

North Carolina
North Core Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore
South Core Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore
Shackleford Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore

New Jersey
North Beach, Sandy Hook National Seashore
N. Gunnison Beach, Sandy Hook National Seashore

New York
Sunken Forest Beach, Fire Island National Seashore
Watch Hill Beach, Fire Island National Seashore

Oregon
Cannon Beach

South Carolina
Isle of Palms
Surfside Beach

Texas
Rockport Beach
Malaquite Beach, Padre Island National Seashore
Little Shell Beach, Padre Island National Seashore
Big Shell Beach, Padre Island National Seashore

U.S. Virgin Islands
Trunk Bay, Virgin Islands National Seashore
Maho, Virgin Islands National Seashore
Hawksnest, Virgin Islands National Seashore

Virginia
Tom's Cove Beach, Assateague Island National Seashore

Washington
Rialto Beach, Olympic National Park
Kalaloch Beach, Olympic National Park

Wisconsin
Bradford Beach Milwaukee
North Beach Racine
Julian Bay Beach, Apostle Island National Lakeshore
Little Sand Bay Beach, Apostle Island National Lakeshore
Meyers Beach, Apostle Island National Lakeshore

7 Tips for Family Beach Safety*

1. Keep kids within arms reach (especially in the sea, but also on land)

2. Don't dive in (2/3 of catastrophic neck/head/spinal injuries occur in the ocean and sea)

3. Knee deep is too deep (strong winds, waves and currents create dangerous rip currents that can sweep a child out to sea)

4. Know before you go (swim near a lifeguard - know your flags; red means stop/green means go)

5. Take frequent breaks (every hour take a sun, bathroom, or water break)

6. Go with the wind (children tend to take the course of least resistance - follow the wind to find your lost kid)

7. Look but don't touch (call local authorities to help injured/stranded sea life)

*The Clean Beaches Council has collaborated with Dr. Tom Griffiths, Director of Aquatics at The Pennsylvania State University to produce the "7 Tips for Family Beach Safety." This guide is meant to help families make the most of their trip to the beach.

For More Information: http://www.cleanbeaches.com

Contact: Walter McLeod, (202) 380-9300

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