The WinkBall Project signals the future of video communication

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Video messaging service to bring people and businesses closer together through the power of video and effect social change for Digital Britain

The WinkBall Project is the most comprehensive and timely communications service we have produced yet. With ten years experience in media convergence we are well placed to take advantage of the switch from a text-based Internet to a new, video era to coincide with the launch of The Government's Digital Britain Report earlier this year.

Put 30 of the most ambitious digital creative minds in the UK in a "shed" for three years, give them the task of inventing more personal, fun ways to communicate online and what do you get? The Winkball Project and its range of exciting new services, launched today (http://www.winkballproject.com ).

The WinkBall Project has now launched a range of public and corporate services that enable people to communicate and broadcast using video. The first of these services to launch is WinkBall.com, which offers the public free video messaging, video blogging, public and private group video walls, and the new "Push to See and Talk" live messaging system.

The WinkBall Project have also developed a range of corporate communication tools including WinkBall Base, an internal video communications service that enables people working together - and their clients - to communicate within a private network. Furthermore, brands can also utilise WinkBall Broadcaster, a video message broadcasting, marketing and email campaigning service that can be used across WinkBall.com and WinkBall Base services.

At the end of video messages sent, or posted on blogs and walls is a five-second video display advertising space. This space is for advertisers to create Personalised Video Campaigns (PVCs) that take advantage of the web friendly five-second Web-Vert video format, devised and pioneered by Winkball following research undertaken at Goldsmiths. Web-Verts can be strategically placed on WinkBall communications to benefit from users' heightened state of cognitive awareness when viewing video messages. Companies including Littlewoods and Traid are already using this innovative means of advertising to communicate their messages - without interfering with the user experience.

Established in 2005 and led by creative computer scientist Dr James Ohene-Djan of Goldsmiths College and online media pioneer Duncan Barclay, founder of Correspondent.com, the WinkBall Project mission is to allow everyone to communicate using the emotional power of video. The project team is based in London and is drawn from fields as varied as media communications, design, computing, business and anthropology - many of whom have graduated from London's Goldsmiths University.

Co-founder Dr James Ohene-Djan said: "The WinkBall Project is all about putting the person rather that the technology at the centre of online communications. Good communication is emotional communication. 65% of all communication is body language; however this crucial information is lost in the current generation of text-based blogs, forums and email messages. We at the WinkBall Project are creating new technologies and services to change all that. The WinkBall Project is about seeing what people have to say, carrying a message with emotion, connecting with friends and engaging with the public all by communicating using video messaging."

Duncan Barclay, who has been creating innovative media communication products since 1999 when he founded Correspondent.com, said: "The WinkBall Project is the most comprehensive and timely communications service we have produced yet. With ten years experience in media convergence we are well placed to take advantage of the switch from a text-based Internet to a new, video era to coincide with the launch of The Government's Digital Britain Report earlier this year."

WinkBall is one of the first UK companies providing services in line with the government's Digital Britain initiative, enabling citizens to overcome the obstacles of effective digital communication. A successful public project has already been launched with the Information Communications Technology charity, Deafax, to encourage video communication within the UK deaf community.

The WinkBall Project has also been working on beta projects with a number of organisations including Littlewoods and desalination infrastructure company Subsea, which harness the emotional power of talking face-to-face to improve communication both internally and externally. WinkBall also carried out a successful beta project with The Daily Telegraph called ChristmaSee in December 2008, which encouraged members of the public to send video messages instead of Christmas cards. This project raised over £6,000 for various charities.

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Laura Nettley
WinkBall
020 7025 1506
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