FoodFacts.com Announces Innovative Site Redesign: Find Out What You're Really Eating

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Want to find out what's really in your food? FoodFacts.com (http://www.foodfacts.com), the trusted consumer food resource Web site, has the answers. And now, FoodFacts.com is even better than before! The site has improved upon its impressive database of crucial information on over 75,000 food products with a cutting-edge redesign.

The world's most comprehensive online consumer food resource Web site is now even better than before! FoodFacts.com (http://www.foodfacts.com) is proud to unveil its cutting-edge site redesign, featuring exciting improvements to its trusted food and nutrition database. The site, which has been providing consumers with vital dietary information since 2001, is putting forth a variety of new tools to help consumers better understand nutrition facts, manage their diets, find allergy-free foods, avoid hidden ingredients and more.

These days, bread is no longer made with just wheat, yeast, salt and water. Multi-syllabic artificial ingredients have replaced whole, natural ones, and even the simplest forms of nourishment have been transformed into nutrition nightmares. Substances such as high-fructose corn syrup, silicon dioxide and azodicarbonamide have become fundamental ingredients in scores of processed products. What are these ingredients, and are they healthy? (The latter, a chemical found in some breads in the U.S., has been banned as a food additive in Europe and Australia.)

FoodFacts.com has the answers. Unlike other nutrition Web sites, FoodFacts.com helps users gauge the quantity and quality of foods by giving it's members both nutrition values and ingredient information for each product; this powerful combination along with user friendly tools helps dieters tackle portion control and optimize their health at the same time.

The site, which has been sorting out food facts and fiction for over eight years, was the first comprehensive food guide on the Internet. And now that FoodFacts.com has kicked off a new redesign, users can search foods by product name, UPC code or ingredients; plan meals with the quick recipe finder; make shopping lists that can be printed, e-mailed or sent to a phone; and more! These features are in addition to the Web site's encyclopedic database of crucial information on over 75,000 food products.

The famous FoodFacts.com database is unmatched by any other Web site. Key in unwanted or harmful ingredients, from peanuts to red 40, and you can search, save, list and sort hundreds of products that fit your dietary needs. Creating gluten-free and vegan grocery lists is now as easy as pie! This feature is especially important to expectant mothers, parents, those with food allergies and health issues, fitness trainers, nutritionists and dietitians - but every person with an appetite and a concern for his or her health will find FoodFacts.com indispensable.

Stan Rak, president and founder of FoodFacts.com, initiated the redesign with consumers in mind. According to Rak, "The time is right. Obesity is rampant in the United States, and food allergies and sensitivities are becoming more prevalent at an alarming rate. FoodFacts.com addresses these issues comprehensively and objectively, and allows for food enthusiasts to become more proactive and knowledgeable about all of the foods they eat. We want them to be able to access it quickly and easily, with the most up-to-date features a Web site can offer today."

Stan Rak created the site to be an independent and trustworthy resource for consumers. FoodFacts.com has no associations with food manufacturers, grocery stores or restaurants, and it alerts users to controversial ingredients such as potentially harmful chemicals and other additives.

Much of FoodFacts.com is free, including a sizable portion of searchable nutrition and ingredient data. Paid members have access to even more helpful tools, from personal food profiles to a quick and easy recipe finder. The recipe finder is an indispensable tool for consumers with one or more dietary restrictions, as it allows them to create customized shopping lists that can be e-mailed, printed or sent to a phone - plus more.

For more information, visit the FoodFacts.com blog (blog.foodfacts.com/), or follow us on Twitter (http://www.twitter.com/foodfactscom).

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Tiffany Gale
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