Linwood Group Reveal New Guide to Residential Private Rehab

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Linwood Group reveal what works and what doesn't work when looking at private residential rehab treatment following on from a research study by Addiction Today.

If there a client faces hurdles in accessing treatment, then there's a greater chance they'll fall by the wayside. The key thing is to minimise the time between them seeking help and their assessment and admission to a treatment programme

Linwood Group reveal what makes one residential private rehab treatment centre more effective than another. Most people wouldn't hesitate to seek medical help to address a persistent health problem that was affecting their life, career or family relationships. But for many who have become dependent on alcohol, the idea of entering a residential private rehab programme can seem like an enormous step.

That's a shame, because a private rehab treatment programme could provide them with the opportunity to tackle the problem and start their physical, emotional and spiritual recovery. Last year, a research study from Addiction Today concluded that substance dependency treatment "appears as successful for a range of chronic conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension and asthma".

And private rehab treatment is not just for the wealthy, the report's authors concluded: "The costs of treatment are more than outweighed by the financial savings it brings."

However, it is essential that people are can easily access the right kind of treatment for them, as not all programmes are equally effective and delays and waiting lists will almost certainly hamper the client's journey to recovery. That's where private rehab treatment comes in, says Sue Allchurch, research director of the Linwood Group.

"If there a client faces hurdles in accessing treatment, then there's a greater chance they'll fall by the wayside. The key thing is to minimise the time between them seeking help and their assessment and admission to a treatment programme," she explains.

So what should they be looking for from private residential rehab? The research from Addiction Today offers some useful guidelines:

1. The rehab centre's approach should reflect clients' belief and expectations

There is evidence that some approaches might be slightly more effective overall for particular categories of client, the Addiction Today researchers acknowledge. "But it would appear that the most important consideration in this regard is the client's own views and beliefs, and these should be taken into account where possible," they say.

2. Treatment should be based on individual needs

The length of treatment, setting, approach, range of issues addressed, use of medication and so on, should be tailored to the individual, based on a clear assessment of their needs. "A standard, one-size-fits-all approach is of limited value and might actually make matters worse," says the Addiction Today report.

3. Treatment should enhance motivation and self-efficacy

In a private residential rehab setting, it's vital that treatment professionals work with clients to build up their confidence in their ability to change and motivate them to make and maintain the changes required.

4. Treatment should address unhelpful attitudes and beliefs

It's common for problem drinkers to believe that they "can't have fun without drinking" or "need alcohol to cope with stress". Left unaddressed, these beliefs could undermine the client's long-term chances of overcoming their dependency.

5. Important lessons in relapse prevention are a vital element of treatment

Practical skills training for avoiding and coping with situations that might otherwise lead to a relapse can improve long-term outcomes for clients. Exploring how a client might respond positively to these situations, and cope with them without alcohol, can strengthen their resolve and ensure that they are prepared when the leave the residential rehab centre.

Residential private rehab can be the most effective setting for many people, especially those who haven't succeeded in tackling their problems alone or as part of outpatient programmes. If you need more information, please contact Linwood Group.

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Sue Allchurch
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