Caravan Insurance - Caravan and Motorhome Awnings Need Proper Cover

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Caravan and Motorhome owners need to ask themselves now - "is my awning fully covered for storm damage under my caravan insurance policy?" The caravan awning is the most vulnerable piece of equipment when the wind gets up but some caravan insurance policies provide limited cover for what could become a more common occurrence. Here are some steps that can be taken to reduce the possibility of damage.

is my awning fully covered for storm damage under my caravan insurance policy?

Caravan and Motorhome owners need to ask themselves now - "is my awning fully covered for storm damage under my caravan insurance policy?"

As climate change makes our British weather ever more unpredictable, storm damage is almost certainly going to be on the increase. For caravanners their awning is the most vulnerable piece of equipment when the wind gets up.

So what should caravanners do to reduce the possibility of their valuable awning being damaged or in the worst case completely ruined. There are four things that every Caravan, Folding Camper or Motorhome owner should do before they set off to the site with their awning.

1. Change the awning pegs for some bigger ones that have better grip and take along a rubber mallet to make sure they are hammered home well.

2. Buy storm straps, the flat webbing type and read the instructions on how to set these up correctly.

3. Check the weather forecast before setting off and each evening before retiring to bed. If it looks like the wind will get up check your pegs and fit the storm straps. If the forecast suggests that a storm is rolling in consider taking the awning down while it is still light. Especially on dry hard ground as you may not have it pegged down adequately. You don't want to be trying to take down the awning in the dark with the wind howling.

4. Check your Caravan Insurance policy or Motorhome insurance actually covers the awning for storm damage and if there are any exclusions in the small print that could catch you out. If the worse comes to the worse and you have to claim for a ruined awning you want to have the reassurance that your claim will be dealt with promptly and fairly.

The most common Caravan Insurance claim for awnings is for storm damage but some caravan policies specifically exclude any form of storm damage to awnings and others have restrictive small print which says something like "Awnings are only covered for storm damage if the caravan is also damaged at the same time". Very often the only damage will be a ripped awning cover and bent or broken poles, the caravan is often undamaged.

Phil Holden, MD of Caravanwise the Caravan Insurance specialist says "There's really only been two types of claim for awnings, in over 10 year experience as a specialist in caravan insurance. They are either stolen along with the caravan or they are ripped by high winds and the second of those situations accounts for the majority of awning claims that we see.

The caravan insurance claim form seem to tell the same story time and time again. Typically it goes like this.

"The wind got up in the night and the wife and I thought we should try and take the awning down to save it being blown away. We got it half way down and there was an almighty gust of wind and the wind pulled it out of our hands and ripped it to shreds".

We have had them end up in the tops of trees in tatters and often it is just the cover that is ripped, perhaps with some of the poles being bent. It is very rare for the caravan to be damaged at the same time."

Some policies would not cover this type of claim but the touring Caravan Insurance policy from Caravanwise provides full coverage.

A decent awning can easily cost over £1000 and will cost around £20 to insure on a caravan insurance policy but that £20 could be a waste of money if you find that it isn't covered for storm damage after it is ripped in high winds.

Contact:

Philip Holden
Caravanwise Caravan Insurance
01425 280078
http://www.caravanwise.co.uk

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