Arnold Briefing Technical Information Managers From 13 U.S. Agencies

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Stephen E. Arnold, president of Arnold Information Technology (ArnoldIT.com) and a recognized expert on online systems and information processing, will give the keynote address at an invitation-only conference organized by the CENDI, interagency working group of senior scientific and technical information (STI) managers from 13 U.S. federal agencies.

Google has building blocks. What is important for the U.S. government is that some firms have already begun to use Google tools to deliver dataspace functions today

Stephen E. Arnold, president of Arnold Information Technology (ArnoldIT.com) and a recognized expert on online systems and information processing, will give the keynote address at an invitation-only conference organized by the CENDI, interagency working group of senior scientific and technical information (STI) managers from 13 U.S. federal agencies.

CENDI representatives will receive a briefing on the challenges of changing information technology, particularly as related to the Internet and Google, and how those challenges may affect the federal government. The keynote will be delivered at the headquarters of the National Technical Information Service in Alexandria, Virginia.

Arnold will summarize the current climate of online information access, covering how data is organized and how users access it.

"Google has building blocks. What is important for the U.S. government is that some firms have already begun to use Google tools to deliver dataspace functions today," Arnold said. He will summarize what users generally want when they search online, what they usually find, and what questions the "new wave" of search systems will raise, including implications for personal privacy, commercial information companies and government agencies generating content.

Arnold is the author of three technical analyses of Google's infrastructure. His most recent work published in July 2009 is "Google: The Digital Gutenberg." This study looks in depth at Google's potential outside of its classic and traditional search origins. It explains how an individual or organization, developer or innovator can use Google to build a business that "surfs on Google." Information can be monetized using Google's infrastructure as "a next generation publishing and monetizing platform." The reference to Google's Wave is not an accident, because "Google Wave" is one first of the digital bundling services that Google will deploy. A summary is posted at http://www.infonortics.com/publications/google/google-gutenberg.html.

Arnold's Google trilogy comprises about 500 pages of text, technical diagrams and tabular material. Unique in these monographs is the analysis of Google's patent documents and technical papers spanning the period from 1998 to 2009. Arnold said, "With a fine grained analysis of Google's public technical documents, I have been able to discern strategic technology initiatives that are largely unknown outside of a small coterie of Google's senior engineers and scientists. The implications of Google's technical capabilities are significant, particularly for businesses who perceive Google as a Web search and advertising company."

The first volume, "The Google Legacy," is an overview of Google and of its technology. It provides a look at the foundation technologies and their use within Google and at such core Google services as maps, search and data management. A summary is posted at http://www.infonortics.com/publications/google/google-legacy.html.

The second volume, Google Version 2.0, drilled down into Google's technology as revealed or suggested by its patents and describes key Google technical innovations developed between 2005 and 2007, a period that Arnold describes as the thrusters for Google's current line up of products and services. A summary is posted at http://www.infonortics.com/publications/google/google-predator.html.

Mr. Arnold offers a number of detailed briefings about Google's technical innovations in financial services, publishing, telecommunications, and four other business sectors in which Google's technology equips Google to be a disruptive force.

A detailed summary of his September 9, 2009, speech will be posted the day of the conference at http://www.arnoldit.com/wordpress.

About Stephen E. Arnold

Stephen E. Arnold monitors search, content processing, text mining and related topics from his office in Kentucky. He works with colleagues worldwide on a wide range of online and content-related projects. The company's Web site is http://arnoldit.com, and the Beyond Search blog is at http://arnoldit.com/wordpress/.

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