September is National Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month

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To raise awareness of the dangers of brain aneurysms and increase public awareness and understanding of brain aneurysms, including methods of early detection and treatment, the month of September has been designated Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month.

Brain aneurysms can occur in anyone, at any age. An estimated 3-6 million people in the United States have an unruptured brain aneurysm. Each year, about 32,000 people in the U.S. will suffer a ruptured brain aneurysm.

If the brain aneurysm is diagnosed early with proper screening, an aneurysm can be treated before it ruptures, saving lives. About 40% of those experiencing a ruptured brain aneurysm will die.

To raise awareness of the dangers of brain aneurysms and increase public awareness and understanding of brain aneurysms, including methods of early detection and treatment, the month of September has been designated Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month.

The Brain Aneurysm Foundation is currently celebrating 15 years as the nation's only non-profit organization solely dedicated to providing critical awareness, education, support and research funding to reduce the incidence of brain aneurysms. The Brain Aneurysm Foundation hopes to improve these tragic statistics and save lives by funding vital research and increasing awareness.

Although people with unruptured brain aneurysms may have headaches, this is often not associated with the actual aneurysm. Most people with unruptured brain aneurysms are completely asymptomatic have no symptoms, while others may experience some or all of the following symptoms, which suggest an aneurysm, including cranial nerve palsy, dilated pupils, double vision, pain above and behind the eye and localized headaches.

People who suffer a ruptured brain aneurysm will often have warning signs. The following warning signs precede about 40% of major ruptures, including localized headache, nausea and vomiting, stiff neck, blurred or double vision, sensitivity to light and loss of sensation

There are a number of risk factors that medical professionals believe contribute to the formation of brain aneurysms. Avoiding or managing these factors can help decrease the potential for brain aneurysms, including smoking, hypertension, drug use, infection, tumors traumatic head injury, family history, select inherited disorders and presence of an arteriovenous malformation

The Brain Aneurysm Foundation offers many resources to promote proper diagnosis of brain aneurysms including an educational video entitled Early Detection of Brain Aneurysms: Life vs. Death. This 20-minute video is designed to educate primary care physicians, emergency room physicians and first responders on the early detection of brain aneurysms.

A number of events are planned through the United States during the September designed to raise awareness of brain aneurysms. For more information on local events and informational materials on awareness efforts please visit http://www.bafound.org.

About the Brain Aneurysm Foundation
The Brain Aneurysm Foundation was established in Boston, MA on August 19, 1994 as a public charity. The Foundation's mission is to provide support and educational materials to the medical community, the newly diagnosed, survivors, family members, friends and the general public regarding the facts, treatment options, and recovery process for brain aneurysms.

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ERIN CALLANAN
Callanan & Klein Communications
617-431-1171
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