The Abbey Yard: Celebrated Irish Ghost Story to be Adapted into Dramatic, New Novel

Share Article

The Abbey Yard, an original stage play that debuted in Los Angeles back in 2000 and an award-wnning film script penned last year is being adapted into a novel. The story about a murdered man's appearance to his young daughter in an ancient, Irish cemetery unearths riveting secrets, wild fantasies, deadly plots, and pervasive Celtic spirits.

News Image
What I think is different and compelling about The Abbey Yard is that it is not only a tale laced with fascinating elements of Celtic mythology, but it all happens within the context of real, historical events. In addition, we finally have a coming of age story about young girls who are every bit as dynamic, inquisitive, and self-motivated as young male protagonists.

The Abbey Yard, an award-winning screenplay by Patricia M. Mahon of Los Angeles, is being adapted into a dramatic, new novel. The Fantasy-Period Piece script has been the recipient of numerous awards including a Platinum Remi Award at WorldFest Houston as well as honors by the PAGE Screenwriting Awards, the European Independent Film Festival, and the London Independent Film Festival.

The Abbey Yard is an original, Irish ghost story that first debuted as a stage play at The Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles back in 2000. Mahon spent 8 years perfecting the film script and has now turned her attention to adapting the powerful narrative into a riveting novel.

Set just before the 1916 Irish uprising, The Abbey Yard recounts the true account of a murdered man's manifestation (John Holden) to his young daughter in an ancient Celtic cemetery. Holden's appearance sparks sudden panic and exposes deep conflicts within the town. The feverish search for Holden crosses mythical barriers and rural faery paths. We meet beasts of all sizes and shapes. Some resemble animals, others withered old men. There are beautiful queens and rough, lumbering giants. There are Celtic faeries, wood elves, and pixies as well as fingerless, toeless hunchbacks that dance in the wild revelry of alluring music.

The setting for the The Abbey Yard is the quaint town of Graignamanagh, (literally The Village of the Monks) that sits in a secluded valley in County Kilkenny. It is a place of brilliant epiphanies and grand contradictions. The ancient Duiske Abbey which still stands at the center of the small village is a bastion of faith and spiritual continuity. But, it was also the site of the notorious slaughter of abbey monks at the behest of Elizabeth I in 1536.

Mahon, a life-long student and scholar of Irish Literature, attended Manhattanville College in New York; Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland; and the WB Yeats International Summer School in Sligo. In discussing the story first told to her by her grandmother, she states, "What I think is different and compelling about The Abbey Yard is that it is not only a tale laced with fascinating elements of Celtic mythology, but it all happens within the context of real, historical events. In addition, we finally have a coming of age story about young girls who are every bit as dynamic, inquisitive, and self-motivated as young male protagonists."

The Abbey Yard ultimately examines the coming of age of Sadie Connelly in rural Ireland and her life in a small town grappling with modernity, myth, and the heavy burden of its deep, monastic roots. It is a story about faith hurling headlong into faeries and that very famous "yard" where one can not only hear the chant of the monks but the extraordinary "other" things that walk and talk in the Irish night.

The author can be reached by email at ptmahon (at) aol (dot) com.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Patricia Mahon

818-884-4690
Email >