Price for Fashion - Earlobe Correction Following Gauged Piercings

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Beverly Hills plastic surgeon, certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgeons (ABPS) and a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS), Dr. Ivan Thomas has been practicing the art of split and torn earlobe repair surgery for over 15 years in his 28 years of practice. With the increasing demand for earlobe correction following gauged piercings, he is able to take his talent to the next level. Dr. Thomas has been able to help correct earlobe deformity caused by this new trend of piercing.

This is a very challenging procedure, because there is not much ear tissue left

As the mavens of the fashion trend of gauged piercing begin to age and head out to the working world, a need for a new kind of earlobe reconstruction is emerging. Whether the ear is damaged from heavy or tugged earrings or extreme stretched cases, such as those with gauged piercing, the demand for earlobe repair is rapidly increasing and very few plastic surgeons can offer the expertise for corrective surgery. Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Ivan Thomas, M.D., F.A.C.S. has more than 15 years of experience in repairing stretched, split/damaged earlobes.

Originally ritualistic fashions from ancient and South African cultures, gauged piercings are ear piercings that involve disc like elaborate jewelry, which create larger openings in the earlobes. The larger openings are achieved through the stretching of the earlobes over a period of time by increasing the diameter of the disc jewelry. After the earlobes are stretched by gauges or "plugs," they cannot retract back to their original state. Once the earlobe tissue has been stretched beyond its resistance, a string of dangling tissue is left over. This damage is irreversible and the only way to correct this problem is to turn to plastic surgery.

"This is a very challenging procedure, because there is not much ear tissue left," said Dr. Thomas.

An emerging trend in gauged piercing has created a new need for a special type of earlobe reconstruction, which is approached with delicacy and uniqueness by Dr. Thomas. He will determine if earlobe reconstruction following a gauged piercing is an option. This will depend upon the individual case. Oftentimes, there is not enough "normal" earlobe tissue to operate. In order to correct the stretched earlobe, Dr. Thomas will need to reconstruct the existing earlobe tissue. To achieve this goal, he will create a normal curvature using this tissue, and then trim the left over skin.

A very detailed procedure, earlobe reconstruction can take anywhere from three to five hours in the operating room and is performed under general or local anesthesia. Typically, patients should anticipate up to a week of recovery time and can resume wearing earrings six months after surgery.

Besides performing earlobe correction following gauged piercing, Dr. Thomas has also performed hundreds of surgeries for traditional earlobe repairs. He corrects stretched and torn earlobes resulting from heavy jewelry, relentless tugging, and accidental tears. This type of repair is done by utilizing Dr. Thomas' inverted "T" Incision technique. This technique is different than that of his unique earlobe correction for gauged piercing. Through the "T" Incision technique, he is able to create a hidden incision that prevents the wound from sinking, resulting in beautifully seamless repairs.

A leading board certified plastic surgeon of the Beverly Hills area, Dr. Thomas offers the most advanced techniques developed by years of experience and creativity at his Los Angeles and Lancaster practice. The finest care is provided in a comfortable, professional environment. One of few plastic surgeons who perform reconstructive, torn, and stretched earlobe repairs, Dr. Thomas has been featured on ABC for these unique corrective procedures. For before and after photos or to request an interview with Dr. Thomas, please contact Norma at (310) 203-8297.

http://www.ivanthomasmd.com

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Sara Folsom

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