Scrappage Scheme for the Double Glazing Industry: Will Homeowners Get Behind It?

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The Glass and Glazing Federation have launched a petition calling on the government to introduce a scrappage scheme as subsidy to new double glazing in UK homes.

Just one week ago top executives from the car industry met with the Business Secretary, Lord Mandelson, to call for an extension to the UK's car scrappage scheme beyond its current £300m budget.

But now it is the turn of an industry that has been largely left to fend for itself during the downturn to make its claim on the public purse.

The Glass and Glazing Federation (GGF) have launched a petition through Downing Street's official website to ask for a scrappage scheme to be extended into the glazing industry.

The view that the double glazing and window industry is worthy of government support is not a new one. Indeed, since May of this year commentators from both inside and outside of this industry have noted that subsidy would not just support the employment base of the industry, but also promote the purchase of a product that would help the government meet its obligation to cut emissions; properly installed energy efficient double glazing.

A similar justification was given by motoring executives earlier this year, when they argued that a scrappage scheme for cars would provide the financial motivation people needed to trade older, less fuel efficient and more polluting vehicals for newer ones.

The implementation of a fully fledge scrappage scheme for the double glazing industry would certainly show a deeper commitment to helping homeowners lower their property's carbon footprint than [news of low interest loans for homes that make energy efficient home improvements. It will be interesting to see whether the GGF's petition can engage homeowners into getting behind their campaign.

The GGF initially need 500 signatures on their petition for it to advance. To make your voice heard, simply visit:

petitions.number10.gov.uk

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