New York Law School Presents the "D Is for Digitize" Conference on the Google Book Search Lawsuit

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New York Law School's Institute for Information Law & Policy will hold a three-day conference, "D Is for Digitize," which will cover the controversial Google Book Search lawsuit and proposed settlement from A to Z. The conference will be held from October 8 to 10 at the Law School's new building, located at 185 West Broadway.

The Google Book Search Project, Lawsuit, and Settlement

New York Law School's Institute for Information Law & Policy will hold a three-day conference, "D Is for Digitize," which will cover the controversial Google Book Search lawsuit and proposed settlement from A to Z. The conference will be held from October 8 to 10 at the Law School's new building, located at 185 West Broadway.

The conference is organized by Professor James Grimmelmann, an expert on copyright and the Authors Guild v. Google lawsuit, in which authors and publishers sued Google for copyright infringement for scanning millions of books from the collections of major libraries. The proposed settlement, which is currently being renegotiated, would authorize Google to sell electronic versions of those books. Professor Grimmelmann's article "How to Fix the Google Book Search Settlement" is the most frequently cited and discussed analysis of the proposed settlement. He is also the creator of the Public Index Web site of information on the settlement.

"With the parties redrafting the settlement, now is the time for public discussion of what the revised version should say," Professor Grimmelmann said. "D Is for Digitize will bring together leading experts from all points of view for a full, respectful, and open dialogue."

The conference will feature an interdisciplinary lineup of academics and practitioners who will examine the settlement through the lenses of civil procedure, the publishing industry, literary culture, information policy, copyright, and antitrust. In addition to Professor Grimmelmann, other expert panelists include Dan Clancy, Engineering Director of the Google Book Search project and Gary Reback, prominent anti-trust lawyer with Carr & Ferrell LLP. The conference will be keynoted by Paul Courant of the University of Michigan and Pamela Samuelson of the University of California at Berkeley. For a full list of speakers, click here.

Thursday will feature pre-conference tutorials of interest to New York's vibrant publishing industry; "The Google Book Search Project, Lawsuit, and Settlement" and "The Controversy Is Context," will explain the provisions of the proposed settlement and their associated legal issues in detail. CLE credit is available for both sessions. The day's events begin at 12:30 p.m. The main conference will begin at 9:00 a.m. on Friday and 9:30 a.m. on Saturday. For a full schedule and list of panels, click here.

The cost of Thursday's tutorials are $50.00 for professionals and $25.00 for academic, non-profit, and self-employed attendees. CLE credit is available for an additional fee of $120.00 ($40.00 a credit, three credits are being offered). CLE credit is non-transitional. The cost of the main conference (individual days cannot be purchased separately) on Friday and Saturday is $200.00 for professionals and $100.00 for academic, non-profit, and self-employed attendees.

To register for the conference online, please visit: http://www.regonline.com/disfordigitize. For more information, please call the Institute for Information Law & Policy at 212.431.2368 or e-mail booksearch at nyls dot edu.

Press should contact Nancy Guida or LaToya Jordan in the New York Law School Marketing and Communications Office at 212.431.2872 for credentials. Professor Grimmelmann will be available for one-on-one interviews on Friday, October 9 at 6:00 p.m. and Saturday at 1:30 p.m. after the conference ends.

About New York Law School
Founded in 1891, New York Law School is an independent law school located in lower Manhattan near the city's centers of law, government, and finance. New York Law School's renowned faculty of prolific scholars has built the School's strength in such areas as constitutional law, civil and human rights, labor and employment law, media and information law, urban legal studies, international and comparative law, and a number of interdisciplinary fields. The School is noted for its eight academic centers: Center on Business Law & Policy, Center on Financial Services Law, Center for International Law, Center for New York City Law, Center for Professional Values and Practice, Center for Real Estate Studies, Institute for Information Law & Policy, and Justice Action Center. New York Law School has more than 13,000 graduates and enrolls some 1,500 students in its full- and part-time J.D. program and its four advanced degree programs in financial services law, real estate, tax, and mental disability law studies. http://www.nyls.edu

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