A New Way to Look At Behavioral Management: Mackin Published in Training Magazine's Online Resource

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Deborah Mackin, Senior Consultant at New Directions Consulting, a leadership development firm located in Vermont, was recently published in Training Magazine's online resource ManageSmarter.com. In the feature, "The Belief: Behavior Connection: a New Way to Look at Behavioral Management," Mackin discusses that the prevailing method for managers to correct poor performance in an employee is heavily based on trying to change an employee's behavior. Mackin introduces a new way to analyze an employee's poor performance and regain a productive, more efficient employee, the Belief: Behavior Connection model©.

Deborah Mackin, Senior Consultant at New Directions Consulting, a leadership development firm located in Vermont, was recently published in Training Magazine's online resource ManageSmarter.com. In the feature, "The Belief: Behavior Connection: a New Way to Look at Behavioral Management," Mackin discusses that the prevailing method for managers to correct poor performance in an employee is heavily based on trying to change an employee's behavior. Mackin introduces a new way to analyze an employee's poor performance and regain a productive, more efficient employee.

With the Belief: Behavior Connection model©, Mackin proposes that managers should look at the root cause of the behavior or the "belief" of the employee and work with the employee to change the poor belief structure in order to gain maximum performance. She argues that if you can change an employee's belief that, "sloppy work, absenteeism, missed deadlines, poor communication, or indifference" is not the belief of the entire organization then you will have a greater ability to work with the employee and set a new standard or belief within that employee.

In Mackin's Belief: Behavior Connection model© there are certain steps that must be achieved in order to apply the model effectively. First, a manager must generate a discussion in which the link between belief and behavior comes into the conscious mind of the problematic employee and can be discussed. In this step, it is essential not focus on what the person is saying, but rather on what you think the person believes about his/her behavior. The second step--once the belief has been surfaced--is to create a discrepancy in the employee's mind about the belief. Thirdly, it's important to state the belief you want the individual to have moving forward.

When asked why she thinks this new model is so important for managers and supervisors today, Mackin states, "When we apply the B: BC model©, we understand better that our thoughts are our beliefs. Those beliefs program our subconscious mind, which then goes about executing the belief in the form of behavior. Our success with addressing and changing problem behavior comes when we are able to disrupt the prevailing thought (belief) and invite the person to consider a new, more productive belief for the better of the whole company. You then become the coach and mentor the employee wants to have." A full version of this article can be found at: http://www.managesmarter.com/msg/content_display/training/e3i57cc798c878be146a5ae94b43c3c87c4

Deborah Mackin is the author of "The Team Building Tool Kit," 2nd Edition (Amacom, 2007). She is an international consultant and management trainer/coach and president and founder of New Directions Consulting, Inc. For more information please visit: http://www.NewDirectionsConsulting.com

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