Rhythm Time Music Classes For Toddlers More Popular Than Ever

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Rhythm Time music classes for toddlers are proving more popular than ever as parents rush to give their children a musical head start. Toddlers who learn the importance of musical pitch and rhythm at an early age will be better prepared for school music tests that decide whether or not they can go on to learn instruments.

Rhythm Time music classes for toddlers

Every child is musical and has a sense of rhythm. However, a sense of pulse is something that has to be taught.

Rhythm Time music classes for toddlers are proving more popular than ever as parents rush to give their children a musical head start. Toddlers who learn the importance of musical pitch and rhythm at an early age will be better prepared for school music tests that decide whether or not they can go on to learn instruments.

Toddlers represent more than half of all youngsters developing their three C’s – confidence, creativity and co-ordination – at Rhythm Time. Rhythm Time operates from nearly 200 different premises across the UK, helping around 10,000 children every week, 53 per cent of them toddlers.

Music classes for toddlers have this year grown at a faster rate than ever before.

Lots of the children who start with Rhythm Time’s music classes for babies continue with music classes for toddlers and then go on the group’s pre-school music classes.

Rhythm Time differs from other early learning classes because its music classes have been developed in parallel with the National Curriculum by a former head of music at a Scottish school.

Rhythm Time was created 15 years ago in Solihull by mother of two Kathy Doolan who trained at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music & Drama in Glasgow.

“Rhythm Time music classes for toddlers have been designed to help them develop their concentration, co-ordination, listening skills and vocal ability,” said Kathy.

The youngsters – aged 15 months to three years old – take part in a series of fun musical activities, some of which involve listening to various rhythms and then imitating them. This activity helps to develop their musical ear, listening skills and vocal ability in a fun environment. Development of their ‘musical ear’ is vital in helping them to pass music tests that they will undergo at school when they wish to start learning to play any instrument.

Kathy said: “Every child is musical and has a sense of rhythm. However, a sense of pulse is something that has to be taught. In our music classes for toddlers, the children cover a wide range of musical skills such as learning to tap in time, playing fast and slow and imitating musical phrases.”

Music teachers and parents with a knowledge of music who have attended Rhythm Time classes understand the importance of these lessons and how they can give children a head start when they begin school.

For more information about music classes for toddlers or how to start a franchise with Rhythm Time, please contact Kathy Doolan, founder and director or Tracy Evans, marketing adviser, 0121 711 4224, rhythmtime.net.

Information For Editors
rhythmtime.net

Rhythm Time
76 Beechwood Park Road
Solihull
B91 1ES
Telephone: 07813 831516 / 0121 711 4224

Rhythm Time was started in Solihull in 1995 by Kathy Doolan. After a very successful five years, Kathy decided to franchise the business in 2000.

Rhythm Time now has franchises all over the UK, operating in 181 areas with approximately 10,000 children attending classes.

Rhythm Time offers three age-appropriate classes for babies (birth to 15 months), toddlers (15 months to three years) and pre-school (three to school age).

Children come to Rhythm Time as tiny babies and progress to toddler and pre-school classes, enjoying a wonderful introduction to music.

All the courses have been created by Kathy, who trained at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music & Drama in Glasgow.

Kathy previously was head of music in a Scottish school and shares with all franchisees and teachers a real passion and belief in the importance of music during a child’s formative years.

Kathy is a strong believer that singing unaccompanied helps to develop a child’s speech and language from an early age and this forms a key element in all the classes.

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Tracy Evans
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