Crisis Prevention Institute Encouraged by Legislation to Address Misuse of Restraint and Seclusion

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Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI) today expressed support for recently announced legislation to protect children from harmful uses of restraint and seclusion in schools and applauded the bill's recognition of the value of training school personnel to protect students.

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“We look forward to working with Congressional leaders to bolster the proposed legislation so that it establishes clear and effective accountability measures and outcomes and provides for ongoing professional development, training, and support.”

Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI), the world's leading training organization specializing in the safe management of disruptive and assaultive behavior, today expressed support for legislation introduced by U.S. Reps. George Miller (CA) and Cathy McMorris Rodgers (WA) and companion legislation by Sen. Chris Dodd (CT) to protect children from harmful uses of restraint and seclusion in schools.

“This legislation is a major stride forward in establishing federal policies to protect students and guide school personnel in ensuring classrooms are safe places for all,” said Tony Jace, CEO, Crisis Prevention Institute. “We look forward to working with Congressional leaders to bolster the proposed legislation to ensure that it establishes clear and effective accountability measures and outcomes and provides for ongoing professional development, training, and support.”

CPI has long advocated the end to abusive seclusions and restraints, and its training programs emphasize methods to avoid physical restraint as a means of maintaining the safety and wellbeing of all students. The legislation also addresses key findings of a Zogby International survey of U.S. teachers recently commissioned by CPI that revealed a significant majority of teachers believe that improved training in defusing and de-escalating situations will help them prevent and safely deal with crisis situations.

Key Facts from the Survey

  • General education teachers surveyed reported they lag behind special education teachers in receiving staff training in dealing with potential classroom violence (43 percent vs. 80 percent).
  • Over 55 percent of teachers surveyed said their schools are more likely to experience disruptive behavior, with 76 percent experiencing verbal confrontations, 65 percent experiencing school fights and, 36 percent witnessing abuse of a staff member in the past year.
  • 82 percent of special education teachers say they feel comfortable that their training equips them to deal with disruptive behavior.

“Chairman Miller, Representative McMorris Rodgers and Sen. Dodd are to be commended for their efforts to craft a comprehensive bill that recognizes the need to provide school personnel with the resources necessary to achieve appropriate training,” said Randolph M. Boardman, Ed.D., Executive Director of Research and Development with CPI. “We concur with the proposed legislation’s focus on staff training in ‘evidenced-based positive behavior supports, de-escalation techniques, and physical restraint and seclusion prevention.’ CPI has devoted three decades of training to achieving these very objectives, and we pledge to lend our expertise to ensure the final legislation is based on the best practices available.”

ABOUT THE CRISIS PREVENTION INSTITUTE

CPI was established in 1980 for human service professionals to address the need for crisis prevention and intervention training in safe, respectful, noninvasive methods. CPI remains on the forefront of critical issues and best practices in behavior management based on its founding philosophy of providing Care, Welfare, Safety, and SecuritySM for everyone involved in a crisis moment. More than 5.4 million professionals across the globe have participated in CPI's Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® training, the most widely used program in the world for managing disruptive and assaultive behavior.

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Robert D. Rettmann
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