The Women's Sexual Health Foundation to Transfer Assets to the National Vulvodynia Association

The Women's Sexual Health Foundation (TWSHF) was established in 2003 to make current information on sexual health and sexual medicine easily accessible to the public and to healthcare professionals. Following a careful review of the resources necessary to continue operating, TWSHF board of directors voted to dissolve the non-profit and donate its assets to the National Vulvodynia Association.

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improve women's health through education, research, support and advocacy.

Cincinnati, OH (PRWEB) December 17, 2009

The Women's Sexual Health Foundation (TWSHF) was established in 2003 to make current information on sexual health and sexual medicine easily accessible to the public and to healthcare professionals. Following a careful review of the resources necessary to continue operating, TWSHF board of directors voted to dissolve the non-profit and donate its assets to the National Vulvodynia Association, which shares a similar mission to "improve women's health through education, research, support and advocacy." The foundation's website, http://www.twshf.org, will continue to operate until the transfer is finalized in early 2010.

"Since its inception, The Women's Sexual Health Foundation has been recognized as a credible source of information influencing public knowledge and opinion," says Executive Director Lisa Martinez RN/JD. "I believe the resources and other educational materials available at our website have made a difference by helping women become their own best advocate.

"I am confident that Phyllis Mate, NVA's Executive Director, and her board will be excellent stewards of the educational and research materials developed by TWSHF and will continue to further our shared objectives to improve health for women everywhere," added Martinez.

Martinez also acknowledges the support and guidance of TWSHF advisory board, the many dedicated advocates and volunteers who helped TWSHF throughout the years and the dedicated reporters who have written about women's sexual health in an accurate, balanced and sensitive way.

"We are honored by the confidence Lisa and the Board of TWSHF have shown in the National Vulvodynia Association by deciding to transfer their assets to us," says Phyllis Mate, NVA's executive director. "This generous gift will help the NVA further our mutual goal of educating healthcare professionals and the public on women's sexual health. Lisa has been a leader and an advocate for women in this area, and we are looking forward to continuing her important work."

About The National Vulvodynia Association:
Established in 1994, the National Vulvodynia Association (NVA) has made a significant impact on both the medical community and women through their many education programs, activities and advocacy for research and research funding.

About The Women's Sexual Health Foundation:
Founded in April, 2003, TWSHF, an international, non-profit foundation, supported a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of sexual health issues. It has served to educate the lay public and healthcare professionals about the current research, diagnosis and treatment of female sexual health difficulties. It strongly advocated for research to benefit practitioners and women in this key area of women's health. During the past six years, founder and executive director Lisa Martinez along with TWSHF's international advisory board of leading professionals in the field of women's health established numerous educational resources, including an award winning web site and blog, a total of twenty-one quarterly journal issues and four educational brochures in three languages available as free downloads on the web site. The Foundation also presented four national conferences on Female Sexual Health in partnership with the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons - two were symposiums for healthcare professionals and two were open to the public.

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