Securities Law Firm Sees Year-End Surge in S-1 Registration Statements

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As 2009 draws to a close many private companies seeking to go public are filing S-1 Registration Statements with the SEC despite the condition of the global economy. These companies hail from many different business sectors including financial services, pharmaceutical research and development, technology and entertainment.

S-1 Registration Statements are on the rise.

It seems that in spite of the economy businesses from a variety of sectors are proceeding aggressively to get their S-1 Registration Statements filed in order to hit the ground running in 2010,” said attorney Laura Anthony, the firm’s founding partner.

Legal & Compliance, LLC, a national corporate and securities law firm, is seeing a surge in S-1 Registration Statements as 2009 draws to a close.

“It seems that in spite of the economy businesses from a variety of sectors are proceeding aggressively to get their S-1 Registration Statements filed in order to hit the ground running in 2010,” said attorney Laura Anthony, the firm’s founding partner.

An S-1 Registration Statement is a comprehensive narrative of the private company going public. The company must disclose; a description of the their business; any assets or properties it may own or control; identification of the company’s officers and directors, pending material transactions between the company and its officers and directors; specific legal proceedings; their plan for distribution of securities; and the intended use of the proceeds.

An S-1 Registration Statement is filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to register the sale of stock, either directly by the Company and/or by certain selling shareholders. The S-1 Registration Statement includes detailed discussions of the business, its operations, the market in which it operates and its management and also includes audited financial statements.

The primary benefit to a private company going public through the filing of an S-1 Registration Statement as opposed to going public through a reverse merger is that the Company does not have to be concerned about undisclosed, potential or contingent liabilities. Moreover, the SEC rules relating to shell companies (such as Rule 144 and Rule 145) prevent the operating company’s shareholders from selling stock using the Rule 144 exemption for twelve months following the completion of the merger.

Securities attorney Laura Anthony is the Founding Partner of Legal & Compliance, LLC, a national corporate and securities law firm based in West Palm Beach, Florida. Ms. Anthony advises private companies that are going public and public companies that trade on the Over the Counter (OTCBB) market.

The attorneys of Legal & Compliance, LLC draft and file S-1 Registration Statements, all SEC filings, conduct reverse mergers, and act as ongoing legal counsel to private and public companies regarding a wide variety of corporate transactions and securities law.

Attorney Laura Anthony can be reached at 800-341-2684, LauraAnthonyPA(at)aol(dot)com or through her firm’s website http://www.LegalAndCompliance.com.

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