Boats, Homes and Rice - Tsunami 'Practical Action' Helps More Than 120,000

Share Article

Five years ago, the tsunami struck on Boxing Day, devastating lives and claiming more than half a million lives. Charity Practical Action has been working with communities determined to rebuild their lives with independence, pride and dignity. Whether building fishing boats, growing different types of crops or building houses, Practical Action has helped more than 120,000 look forward to a brighter future.

Boat building in Sri Lanka

The people of Sri Lanka refused to let this devastating event beat them. We will all remember what happened with sadness yet look forward to a brighter future. Practical Action’s work has meant people regained their pride, dignityand independence.

Boxing Day marks the fifth anniversary of the tsunami which claimed more than half a million lives – one of the biggest natural disasters the world has ever seen.

Yet international development charity, Practical Action, has helped more than 120,000 since the disaster - with its unique approach to projects.

Whether helping people to grow rice which is resistant to saline, working with fishermen to build boats suitable for their needs or helping people build new houses with locally available materials, people have regained their independence while learning new ways of making money.

The charity has been working with communities in Sri Lanka where 31,000 people died and half a million were displaced.

Hardest hit was the fishing industry with a third of Sri Lankan fishermen killed and more than 80 per cent of their boats destroyed – losing 30,000 in total.

In addition, 120,000 houses had to be rebuilt and 25,000 acres of farm land became useless due to high salt levels.

Vishaka Hidellage, Director, Practical Action Sri Lanka, said: "The 2004 tsunami devastated so many lives, yet people wanted to know what they could do move on to rebuild their lives with pride and dignity."

"From fishermen to families, women and disabled people, Practical Action’s work has meant people have found new ways of making a living and regaining their independence."

"Five years later we are still working with communities; the people of Sri Lanka refused to let this devastating event beat them. While we will all remember what happened with tremendous sadness we will continue to look forward to a brighter future."

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Jane Eason
Visit website