Survey Discovers That Parents are Ultimately Responsible to Teach Their Children How to Learn.

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Survey conducted on the staff of a Sydney (Australia) secondary school discovered that 80% of teachers believed it was the role of the parents to develop students' study skills. Unfortunately parents are unaware of this fact.

Parents and teachers need to work together to achieve this.

A Survey conducted at a Sydney secondary school discovered that 80% of teachers believed it was the role of the parents to develop students' study skills.

Prue Salter, an educational expert with Enhanced Learning Educational Services recently carried out a survey of the staff of a Sydney secondary school and discovered that 80% of the teachers at that particular school believed it was the role of parents to develop students' study skills.

Unfortunately, nobody's told the parents.

"'Learning to learn' is one of the most important skills students develop," says Prue. "It includes the ability to work independently, to absorb knowledge and to figure out how to apply it. Parents think it's a job for teachers. Teachers think it's a job for parents. In the middle, a few lucky kids figure it out for themselves. The rest flounder."

Prue fears that study skills have become one of the casualties of modern learning techniques. While she doesn't advocate a return to rote learning, she points out that new approaches to education haven't extended as far as our examination process.

"Schools have become so focused on becoming centres of excellence in new ways of learning and understanding that they sometimes neglect traditional study skills," says Prue. "The reality is that no matter how innovative and cutting edge the curriculum becomes, at this point in time students still have to take exams."

To perform well in exams, students need to develop skills of time management and learning, as well undertake significant amounts of home study. This isn't easy. Most teenagers struggle to manage their time, are easily distracted and simply don't understand how to learn.

"Realistically, do parents have the time or the knowledge to develop these skills in their children?" asks Prue.

These skills are crucial, stretching beyond a few exams to advanced study and the workforce. "Learning how to learn gives our children the skills to learn self-respect and responsibility and the importance of investing in themselves," says Prue. "Parents and teachers need to work together to achieve this."

Enhanced Learning Educational Services are specialists in the development of study skills, and they've taken action to support teachers and parents as they teach students to succeed in this area. The ELES Online Study Skills Handbook offers a comprehensive guide to the study skills needed for success in secondary school studies.

The handbook, found at http://www.studyskillshandbook.com.au, taps into students' interest in technology and is flexible enough to be used in a structured course or independently at school or at home. It includes learning for teachers, parents and students with units ranging from organization and filing to developing motivation and dealing with stress.

The Study Skills Handbook is sold by subscription per school.

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