Michael Jackson Propofol Expert, Barry Friedberg MD, Spoke at Pan Pacific Surgery Meeting

Office-based anesthesia (OBA) presents a unique problem set for anesthesiologists to solve. Patients must wake up quickly and able to go home pain, nausea and vomiting free. “Propofol ketamine or PK anesthesia is a powerful solution that has set a higher standard of care for patient safety in outpatient surgery,” says Dr. F. Don Parsa, Chief of University of Hawaii plastic surgery.

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Goldilocks anesthesia - never too much or too little, always just right

Propofol ketamine or PK anesthesia is a powerful solution that has set a higher standard of care for patient safety in outpatient surgery.

Newport Beach, CA (PRWEB) January 19, 2010

Prominent, board certified anesthesiologist, Dr. Barry Friedberg, recently cited propofol expert in People Magazine’s August 10th Michael Jackson article, spoke at the Biennial Pan Pacific Surgeons’ meeting in Honolulu on Tuesday, Jan. 12th.

The lecture was delivered at the plastic surgeons’ breakout session. Nonetheless, many non-plastic surgeons were also very interested in his powerful message for patient safety.

Office-based surgery is growing at rates not seen since the 1980s. Cosmetic surgeries and many third party covered surgeries are moving to the office setting for the dramatic cost savings over hospital and surgery center based settings.

Office-based anesthesia (OBA) presents a unique problem set for anesthesiologists to solve. Patients must wake up quickly and able to go home pain, nausea and vomiting free.

“Propofol ketamine or PK anesthesia is a powerful solution that has set a higher standard of care for patient safety in outpatient surgery,” says Dr. F. Don Parsa, Chief of University of Hawaii plastic surgery.

Giving Michael Jackson propofol at home is not that dissimilar to giving it in OBA. Both are ‘remote’ settings. In Jackson’s death, none of the three critical patient safety elements (i.e. visual observation, pulse oximetry and brain monitoring) were apparently present.

Propofol is short acting, amnesia and sleep producing, anti-nausea, and anti-oxidant. Propofol is a positive mood-altering drug. Patients wake up clear headed and enjoy having had it.

Propofol is an ideal drug for OBA except for the wide differences between patients’ ability to metabolize propofol that exist. A brain monitor adds patient safety by directly measuring propofol’s brain effects.

Like Jackson, many patients who have OBA fail to disclose other drugs they may be taking when they come for surgery. A BIS brain monitor measures propofol effects independently of many other Valium-like drugs in Jackson when he died.

“Refining PK anesthesia with a brain monitor like a bispectral (BIS) index has made all the difference in the world,” says Friedberg.

Measuring propofol would have detected effects that, when added to the Valium-like drugs, produced Jackson’s apparent failure to keep breathing and likely lead to his avoidable death.

Disclaimer: Neither Dr. Friedberg nor Goldilocks Anesthesia Foundation receive financial support from propofol, ketamine or brain monitor makers.

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