Expert at Storkie Express Unveils the Secrets of Wedding Invitation Wording

To spare brides and grooms the humiliation of a wedding invitation faux pas or do-it-yourself disaster, Debra Gudai, an expert on wedding invitations and President of Storkie Express, unveils three common issues couples face when deciding on their wedding invitation wording and how to avoid them.

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With today’s blended families and many more couples hosting their own weddings, invitation etiquette has changed dramatically

Fort Lauderdale, FL (PRWEB) January 12, 2010

To spare brides and grooms the humiliation of a wedding invitation faux pas or do-it-yourself disaster, Debra Gudai, an expert on wedding invitations and President of Storkie Express, unveils three common issues couples face when deciding on their wedding invitation wording and how to avoid them.

According to the invitation expert, one of the first things couples have to decide is whether to mention parents on the invite. In the past, wedding invitation wording did not contain variation. Since the bride’s parents typically paid for everything, wedding invitations read that her parents requested the honor of the guest’s presence at the marriage of their daughter.

“With today’s blended families and many more couples hosting their own weddings, invitation etiquette has changed dramatically,” acknowledges Gudai. Fitting six names on an invitation can make it look cluttered. To simplify, on the first line of the invitation, the expert recommends adding the bride's and groom’s names and the line: 'together with their families.' Gudai adds that by using this broader wording, the effect is more elegant and etiquette-appropriate, while maintaining wedding invitation traditions.

Wedding invitation wording gets more complicated when the couple prefers an adults-only reception. “How do I tactfully tell my guests I don’t want kids at the reception?” asks Amanda, a Storkie customer and soon-to-be bride from Detroit, Michigan. Gudai recommends two options: “When addressing your invitations, leave the children’s names off.” Additionally, one can be specific in the invitation or reception card with wording such as, “We hope that the two of you will be able to join us,” or “Two seats have been reserved for you at such-and-such location.”

Experts agree that brides and grooms should omit the words: black-tie optional. “Some of your guests may wonder if they’re over or under dressed. It’s either black-tie or it’s not and you should clearly state your preference,” Gudai advises. For additional wedding invitation words of wisdom, check out: http://www.storkie.com/t-invitation-wording.aspx

About Storkie Express:
Storkie Express is a web-based invitations company, providing customers with quality, affordable custom printed invitations since 1990. Storkie Express has a broad selection of beautiful invitations and cards for every special event. With extensive collections of baby shower invitations, baptism invitations, wedding invitations, bridal shower invitations, birthday invitations, Christmas cards, holiday photo cards, and much more, Storkie is sure to have the perfect announcements for any event. Storkie’s iDesign makes personalizing an invitation easy and fun, while professional typesetters review each and every order for that extra quality assurance. At Storkie Express, customers can easily design and order beautiful, high-quality printed invitations at the best prices and with the fastest turn-around time in the industry.

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