NFL Brain Injury Panel Raises Awareness of Potential Long-Term Consequences from Traumatic Brain Injuries

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As nation gathers around televisions to watch Super Bowl, work continues with new committee formed by players' union to explore latest research in brain injuries

These injuries are not limited to the football field or the boxing ring. They occur in everyday accidents on our roads, on job sites and even in our homes.

Last week's first meeting of the special panel formed by the National Football League (NFL) Players Association to study the risks of traumatic brain injuries to football players has significantly raised national awareness of the potential long-term consequences of head injuries.

The Mackey-White Traumatic Brain Injury Committee, named in honor of two Hall of Fame NFL players (John Mackey, who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease, and Reggie White, who died at the age of 43 after retiring from the NFL), has been tasked with opening a dialogue on brain injuries in professional football. The group will study the latest research in the field and begin developing recommendations to keep players safer.

According to Douglas S. Saeltzer, a highly regarded brain injury attorney with the San Francisco-based law firm Walkup, Melodia, Kelly & Schoenberger, a traumatic brain injury can mean lifetime disability, economic devastation, loss of independence, personality changes, loss of earning capabilities, loss of memory, and dependence on family and friends for supervision and care.

"Of all types of injury, a traumatic brain injury is the most likely to result in death or permanent disability," said Saeltzer. "These injuries are not limited to the football field or the boxing ring. They occur in everyday accidents on our roads, on job sites and even in our homes."

Government estimates of the frequency of brain injury indicate that more than 80,000 Americans a year survive hospitalization. It is estimated that 5.3 million Americans are living today with some brain injury-caused disability.

"When a family member is facing a future with a spinal cord injury or a traumatic brain injury, including birth injury cases, the injured person is facing a future full of expenses for medical care, attendant care, and economic losses," said Saeltzer. "Expert attorneys and physicians are essential in order for individuals to assess potential long-term consequences, especially since many brain injury symptoms are not obvious immediately following an injury, and to protect their legal rights."

For more information about Walkup, Melodia, Kelly & Schoenberger, please go to http://www.brain-injurylawyer.com or call 888.732.8897.

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