Put some romance in your baby dance

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‘Put the romance into your baby dance’ is the advice from fertility experts, as Valentine’s Day approaches.

New fertility monitoring technology helps couples to see, days ahead, when the woman’s most fertile times will be. This means they are better informed, more in control and can make sure they’re together at those times, preferably in a relaxed setting.

‘Put the romance into your baby dance’ is the advice from fertility experts, as Valentine’s Day approaches.

For the one in seven UK couples who are trying for a baby but not having much luck, romance needs to stay firmly on the agenda, says Dr Oriane Chausiaux, chief fertility expert at DuoFertility:

“Getting pregnant is all about timing. But some of the ways couples traditionally use to know when to make love can be counterproductive. Early morning temperature readings, peeing on a stick and ‘come home now, I’m ovulating’ are not very amorous and make couples less relaxed about doing ‘the baby dance’.

"There’s so much at stake for people who want a baby but are struggling, that they are bound to feel stressed and lose a lot of the fun and ‘togetherness’ they once had. But if they can feel more in control, I think the romance will come back and this will all combine to optimise their chances of conceiving.

"New fertility monitoring technology helps couples to see, days ahead, when the woman’s most fertile times will be. This means they are better informed, more in control and of course, can make sure they’re together at those times, preferably in a relaxed setting. This all adds up to a far more romantic way of making a baby."

Dr Chausiaux gives the following tips to ‘baby dancers’:

Relax.
Once you know when you will be most fertile, then you should try to relax and just enjoy your time with your partner in the lead up to making love. Think about giving each other a massage, sharing a (not too hot) bath or watching a funny film together. Laughter and relaxation – and hopefully conception - go hand in hand.

Eat Well.
Eating a balanced diet will help to ensure that your body is healthy enough to conceive and nourish a developing baby. A balanced diet also helps to keep sperm production at optimum levels.

Stay Active.
Regular exercise helps to maximise your fitness levels and keeps your weight in check. It also boosts endorphin levels, which help you to feel happy.

Keep It Cool.
The testes should be a couple of degrees cooler than the rest of the body in order to maximise sperm production. It is recommended that men wear loose-fitting underwear and trousers and avoid activities that increase the temperature of the testes, such as saunas and hot showers. They should also avoid sitting on heated car seats.

Take Supplements.
The government recommends that all women trying for a baby should take 400mcg of folic acid a day to help protect against conditions such as spina bifida.

Watch Your Weight.
Being overweight or underweight can disturb your menstrual cycle and affect your fertility. Even a five percent reduction in weight can significantly increase your chances of conceiving, although crash dieting is not recommended.

Drink in Moderation.
Alcohol can affect the fertility levels of both men and women. Excessive alcohol intake also increases the risk of miscarriage.

Stop Smoking.
Smoking has been linked to infertility in both men and women, and has been linked to early menopause in women. It also increases the risk of low birth weight and premature birth.

Prescription Drugs.
Certain prescription drugs can reduce your chances of conceiving - ask your doctor for advice if you are taking prescription drugs while trying for a baby.

Caffeine Intake.
Caffeine intake is another factor that might affect fertility. Indeed, a recent study in Manchester found that the caffeine intake of many women exceeded the recommended limits. But so far, the effect of caffeine intake on infertility and other health problems is relatively unknown.

Avoid the ‘darling, you need to come home now’ panics.
DuoFertility is a discreet underarm sensor that helps couples to predict a woman’s fertility levels up to six days in advance. The small sensor takes up to 20,000 temperature readings throughout the day and night. This predicts and detects the small rise in basal temperature that signals ovulation. A neat hand held monitor downloads the information, giving an easy to read, traffic light guide to a woman’s fertility over the next few days.

http://www.duofertility.com

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Sarah Chapman

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