Spit Roasted Lamb—An Ancient Tradition in your Backyard

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The new season of spring brings many customs, rituals and celebrations, many of them centered around food. The tradition of roasting a whole lamb goes back thousands of years and is still a rite of the season in many modern cultures and ethnic groups. While it can be done with nothing more than a long stick and a crude campfire, SpitJack, a specialty retailer selling cooking tools and appliances for men who cook, offers a more convenient, modern solution—the P55L - Whole Pig, Lamb & Goat Rotisserie with 54" Spit & Accessory Package.

The new season of spring brings many customs, rituals and celebrations, many of them centered around food. The tradition of roasting a whole lamb goes back thousands of years and is still a rite of the season in many modern cultures and ethnic groups. While it can be done with nothing more than a long stick and a crude campfire, SpitJack, a specialty retailer selling cooking tools and appliances for men who cook, offers a more convenient, modern solution—the P55L - Whole Pig, Lamb & Goat Rotisserie with 54" Spit & Accessory Package.

This amazing machine has been specifically engineered and tested to spit roast a pig, lamb, goat or other whole animal up to 50 lbs. easily and safely. Designed to be used on the ground, over an open fire, the P55L system is now the most practical way to spit roast smaller whole animals.

“Spit roasting a lamb is not only an important spring tradition for so many people but it is also one of the most delicious and satisfying ways to prepare and present it,” says Bruce Frankel, a former chef/restaurateur and owner of SpitJack.

The P55L is perfect for anyone (from professional caterers to the regular backyard cook) who wants to roast your meat the old fashioned way - spinning it over a fire, close to the ground, and taking the right amount of time to do it. The process is fascinating even to an experienced chef, the show is spectacular, and the results are incomparable.

Spit Roasted Spring Lamb

While some whole lamb preparations can get quite elaborate, I prefer to keep things as simple as possible. The most important things are to cook it at the proper temperature (low – 225-250F) and for the proper amount of time (until 180F internal). This will take at least one hour for every 10 lbs. of meat. Basting is important, both for taste and texture and injecting with a brine is optional but will give a better overall flavor.

Directions for spit roasting a whole animal and other tips for preparation and cooking can be found in the P55L rotisserie user’s manual at SpitJack.com.

Seasoned Basting Oil

½ cup rosemary leaves (fresh if possible)
½ cup thyme leaves (fresh if possible)
½ gallon olive oil
24 garlic gloves, peeled, smashed and sliced
2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
Combine all ingredients in a pot and heat over low heat until the garlic begins to bubble. Remove from heat and let cool.
Injection Brine
1 cup salt
1 gallon cold water

Combine salt and 1 cup of the water in a large pot and heat, stirring, until the salt has dissolved. Remove from heat and add the remainder of the water. Let cool completely and chill before using.

SpitJack was founded by Bruce Frankel, a former chef/restaurateur in 2004. Online at SpitJack.com and with a retail showroom in Shrewsbury, Mass., SpitJack specializes in selling cooking tools for men. Starting with the simple concept of cooking in an indoor fireplace, the product line has grown to include everything from hearth gloves and wood splitting machines to 700 lb. smokers and whole hog rotisseries. SpitJack provides products, information, discussion, and just about anything a man might need to express himself as a cook.

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BRUCE FRANKEL
SpitJack
508 425 3261
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