IRN Supplies 4.6 Million Pounds of Surplus to Disaster Relief in 2009: Aid Provided to 17 Countries and 14 U.S. States

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In 2009 the Institution Recycling Network (http://www.irnsurplus.com) provided over 4.6 million pounds of surplus furniture, equipment, and supplies for U.S. and international disaster relief and economic development. Matching more than 150 U.S. contributors with a network of charitable relief agencies, IRN facilitated the distribution of surplus to recipients in seventeen countries and fourteen U.S. states.

Since 2004 we’ve shipped more than twenty million pounds of surplus to 36 countries and twenty U.S. states. It's used to furnish schools, clinics and homes in places where the alternative, quite literally, is nothing.

In 2009 the Institution Recycling Network (http://www.irnsurplus.com) provided over 4.6 million pounds of surplus furniture, equipment, and supplies for U.S. and international disaster relief and economic development. Matching more than 150 U.S. contributors with a network of charitable relief agencies, IRN facilitated the distribution of surplus to recipients in seventeen countries and fourteen U.S. states.

Every year, American companies, schools, hospitals and government agencies throw away tens of millions of pieces of usable furniture and equipment. IRN matches these materials with charities that use the surplus for relief and development projects in the U.S. and abroad. The surplus may be used for hurricane and earthquake relief; for schools and orphanages; for communities ravaged by floods; for clinics and hospitals; for regions recovering from civil war; for homes, apartments, and schools in U.S. cities.

According to Mark Berry, IRN’s Surplus Program Manager, Haiti’s earthquake has focused public attention on this need. “Haiti will need large shipments of furnishings for years to come,” he says, “and that’s where many of our projects are now dedicated.”

But Berry notes that Haiti is just one of thousands of places around the world where there’s desperate need for surplus that is discarded in America. “Since 2004 we’ve shipped more than twenty million pounds of surplus to 36 countries on five continents, and to twenty U.S. states,” he says. “These materials are used to furnish schools, clinics, businesses, and individual homes in places where the alternative, quite literally, is nothing. IRN’s role is to match surplus with the organizations and recipients that need it most, then handle the details to make the transfer happen.”

In 2009 IRN completed projects for over 125 different organizations including schools, colleges and universities, hospitals, businesses, and local, state and federal governments. IRN coordinated the services of 21 professional moving companies and 63 trucking firms, with projects as small as a few desks and chairs, as large as two to three dozen shipping containers. New contributing organizations included the University of Notre Dame, the University of Colorado, Quinnipiac University, the Juilliard School, John Carroll University in Ohio, Bainbridge High School in Washington, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, Good Samaritan Medical Center (Brockton, MA), and Genzyme, Inc., among many others.

“They’re saving energy and resources, saving landfill space, almost always saving money, and helping some of the neediest people in our global community,” says Berry. “It’s not IRN but the many, many organizations that have contributed surplus through IRN who are the real champions.”

More information including photos of IRN surplus projects and surplus being reused in the U.S. and abroad can be found at http://www.irnsurplus.com.

About IRN
The Institution Recycling Network (http://www.ir-network.com) is a cooperative recycling organization headquartered in Concord, NH that works with over 200 colleges and universities, hospitals, K-12 schools, and private companies to improve the performance and economics of recycling. IRN negotiates transportation, processing, and marketing of recycled commodities, provides a single point of contact to recycle dozens of different materials, and manages the logistics to get materials to market efficiently and cost effectively. IRN handles over 75 commodities: everything from cardboard and fluorescent lamps to concrete and Astroturf. IRN is known particularly as the most experienced manager of construction and demolition recycling in the U.S. (http://www.WasteMiser.com), and as a major channel that matches surplus furniture, equipment, and other property with U.S. and international relief organizations (http://www.irnsurplus.com).

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