American Diabetes Association Secures Funds for Use in Wisconsin’s Tribal Communities

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The American Diabetes Association in Wisconsin recently secured state funds to augment existing efforts to address diabetes prevention and control in Wisconsin’s tribal communities.

“Our ability to secure these funds demonstrates the strong partnership between the leading diabetes organizations in the state,” said Judy Rupnow, executive director of the American Diabetes Association in Wisconsin. “We are very happy to have helped se

The American Diabetes Association recently secured program revenue service funds under section 20.435(l)(kf) for the Wisconsin Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, a program of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. These funds derive from tribal gaming revenues and are intended to augment existing efforts to address diabetes prevention and control in Wisconsin’s tribal communities.

American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes among all U.S. racial and ethnic groups. According to the 2008 Burden of Diabetes in Wisconsin, almost one third of Wisconsin’s American Indians age 18 years and older have diagnosed diabetes. That’s an estimated 10,580 (32.3%) with diabetes, while another 4,500 (13.7%) are undiagnosed. In Wisconsin overall an estimated 419,870 Wisconsin adults (9.6%) have type 1 and type 2 diabetes (125,150 are undiagnosed). In addition, 6,000 children and adolescents in Wisconsin have diabetes.

Tribal communities were invited to submit project proposals for mini grants to address diabetes prevention and/or control across the lifespan. A sampling of the innovative projects that the DPCP is now funding as a result of these program revenue service dollars include:

  • Recruiting community members to be trained and serve as Healthy Lifestyle Advocates (HLAs) in their community.
  • Teaching community members gardening skills so they learn to grow, harvest and preserve their own fruits and vegetables in a cost-effective, sustainable way.
  • Offering activities for youth to help promote diabetes prevention that include learning activities that they can participate in for the rest of their life, educating about the importance of healthy diets and lifestyle changes to assist in preventing diabetes, learning how to prepare and the chance to try new healthy foods, and reducing children’s “TV time” by educating them about more productive, active, ways to occupy their time.

“Our ability to secure these funds demonstrates the strong partnership between the leading diabetes organizations in the state,” said Judy Rupnow, executive director of the American Diabetes Association in Wisconsin. “We are very happy to have helped secure funding for diabetes programming in a population that is so greatly affected by this disease.”

The Wisconsin Diabetes Prevention and Control Program is dedicated to improving the health of people with or at risk for developing diabetes. For more information about the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program go to http://www.WisconsinDiabetesInfo.org.

The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-888-DIABETES (1-888-342-2383) or visit http://www.diabetes.org. Information from both these sources is available in English and Spanish.

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Pamela Geis

Judy Rupnow
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