New Guide Shows Political Campaigns How to Use the Internet to Win Elections in 2010

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"How Candidates Can Use the Internet to Win in 2010" is a comprehensive guide to effective online political campaigning, including detailed overviews of social media outreach, online advertising, political email, digital fundraising, Twitter, Internet-enabled field organizing and online video.

How Candidates Can Use the Internet to Win in 2010

Online campaigning can be a decisive tool for candidates at any level, whether you're running for dog-catcher or for president.

With the general election only eight months away and Massachusetts Republican Scott Brown already casting votes in Washington, a new guide shows candidates of all political stripes how to use online tools and tactics as Brown, Barack Obama and other candidates have to raise money, find support and turn out voters on election day. "How Candidates Can Use the Internet to Win in 2010" provides a comprehensive look at effective Internet campaigning, including detailed overviews of social media outreach, online advertising, political email, digital fundraising, Twitter, Internet-enabled field organizing and online video.

Written by fourteen-year online politics veteran Colin Delany and including recent lessons learned from Brown's victory over Democrat Martha Coakley, the 31-page guide is available for free download at Epolitics.com. "Barack Obama showed in 2008 that the Internet can be a transformative force in politics," said Delany, "and Brown's campaign demonstrated that it's not limited to the big boys. Online campaigning can be a decisive tool for candidates at any level, whether you're running for dog-catcher or for president."

The new guide focuses on tools and tactics that have been found to work through hard campaign experience over the past decade and begins with an evaluation of the basic technologies both necessary and available to candidates up and down the ladder. In particular, the guide zeroes on in the need to integrate online tools both with each other and with offline activism. "Internet politics doesn't exist in a vaccuum," Delany said. "The real key is using the 'net to put people to work in the real world, in their own communities and social groups."

Later sections examine outreach through Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, YouTube and Google Ads, followed by a detailed analysis of online fundraising and volunteer mobilization. The guide's concluding chapter features a sample campaign online communications plan plus links to articles exploring major topics in depth.

"How Candidates Can Use the Internet to Win in 2010" author Colin Delany launched Epolitics.com in 2006, and the site won a Golden Dot Award as "Best Blog - National Politics" at the 2007 Politics Online Conference. Delany wrote two previous e-books in the online political space, "Learning from Obama: Lessons for Online Communicators in 2009 and Beyond" and "Online Politics 101," together downloaded over 60,000 times from Epolitics.com. Delany also contributes to The Huffington Post and techPresident and is a frequent speaker at conferences and events across the country.

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