Botox VS Dysport -- Should Patients Make the Switch?

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An injectable botulinum toxin Type A protein, like its competitor Botox, Dysport is a popular wrinkle treatment for men and women alike. Experts say it works as well, and possibly better, than the original.

Patients who have tried both treatments haven't sided completely with one product or another. Some patients like the Botox, and some liked the Dysport. We've found that while each one has specific benefits and side effects

Dysport's arrival in the cosmetic industry has pleased many Botox users with lower prices and the promise of longer lasting results. Manufacturers of the new treatment hope this will allow them to take a substantial bite out of Botox's market share, which equates to 2.5 million treatments in the US alone.

Made of botulinum toxin Type A protein, Dysport is administered directly into the muscles that cause fine lines and wrinkles to form on the surface of the skin. However, this injection is weaker than its companion treatment Botox, and therefore, requires an average of three treatments compared to one of the original. Despite the additional treatments, however, it is still considered more affordable and a superior product due to its effectiveness.

Patients who have received the Dysport have experienced results up to 48 hours sooner. This is ideal for those with important events to attend. Some patients have even experienced results just 24 hours after their initial treatment.

Doctors currently administering the injection to their patients have found results of this new treatment have lasted up to a year in many cases, which is far longer than the three month lifespan seen with Botox treatments. Combined with a 20% savings, this is a significant value for most patients. Those who have developed an immunity to Botox have also experienced success with this new formula.

"Patients who have tried both treatments haven't sided completely with one product or another. Some patients like the Botox, and some liked the Dysport. We've found that while each one has specific benefits and side effects, the two products are actually quite similar. The choice really depends on the area being treated and the patient's specific physical makeup," explained Mike Brains for CosmeticSurgeryGuru.com.

Both Botox and Dysport carry risks including unintended paralysis, bruising, swelling, and a burning sensation in and around the injection site. The new product is more effective at treating larger areas, but it also has a risk of spreading too far, so physicians need to take extra precautions with sensitive areas such as around the eyes. Antibody formation is also possible. When this occurs, the body uses antibodies to neutralise the botulinum and prevent it from working.

Originally used for neurological disorders, Dysport has shown to be a highly effective treatment for wrinkles and hyperhidrosis. Before making the switch, however, patients should discuss both products and their concerns with their physician or cosmetic surgeon.

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Mike Brains
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