The Slayer Espresso Machine Revolutionizes Zoka's Already Killer Coffee

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Zoka Coffee & Tea Company's Kirkland, Washington café is now one of only twenty worldwide to host the Slayer espresso machine, the most sought-after machine in cutting-edge espresso equipment. The $14,000 machine is touted for its stylish design and groundbreaking technology, giving baristas the ability to fine-tune the settings for specific beans and flavor profiles. Zoka, a Seattle-based artisan coffee roaster, acquired the Slayer in August of last year.

Slayer Espresso Machine at Zoka Coffee

The Slayer Espresso. Zoka now owns the two-group version of this machine.

It has revolutionized how baristas develop their espresso. The control over pressure allows for some really interesting manipulations of flavor and texture. In a single sentence: the Slayer makes a mean espresso.

Zoka Coffee & Tea Company's Kirkland, Washington café is now one of only 20 worldwide to host the Slayer espresso machine, the most sought-after machine in cutting-edge espresso equipment. The $14,000 machine is touted for its stylish design and groundbreaking technology, giving baristas the ability to fine-tune the settings for specific beans and flavor profiles. Zoka, a Seattle-based artisan coffee roaster, acquired the Slayer in August of last year.

"It's an outstanding piece of technology," says Jeff Babcock, Founder and President of Zoka. "It has revolutionized how baristas develop their espresso. The control over pressure allows for some really interesting manipulations of flavor and texture. In a single sentence: the Slayer makes a mean espresso," he adds.

The pressure control Babcock mentions is a feature unique to the Slayer, giving baristas the ability to finesse the flow of the espresso. A coffee that is too "bright" can be monitored and the pressure varied throughout the course of the shot, subduing sour flavors. These manipulations are all performed manually by a barista well-versed in the Slayer's functions.

Zoka owns a two-group Slayer (meaning two espresso shots can be pulled at a time), which features four individual temperature controlled boilers as opposed to the traditional two, curving wooden paddles, and a mirror running the length of the machine's grate, allowing baristas a view of their shots from wherever they are standing.

Also notable is the Slayer's short stature – it is only 17 inches tall. "There can be eye contact between barista and customer with the Slayer. A relationship can be built over each espresso. At Zoka, coffee is about community, and the Slayer helps foster that community feeling," explains Babcock. Espresso shots from the Slayer take on average fifty seconds – almost twice as long as is customary. "All the more time to relate barista, customer, and coffee," says Babcock.

The Slayer is an exciting addition to Zoka's Kirkland café. "Our baristas are thrilled to work with such a monumental machine, and it is certainly causing a stir with many of our customers," says Babcock. "They want to see the Slayer in action, and taste the difference. This machine is one more step to providing Seattle with the best cup of coffee out there."

About Zoka Coffee and Tea Company:
Nestled in the heart of coffee country - Seattle, WA - Zoka Coffee Roaster and Tea Company opened in 1996. Zoka is a small-batch coffee roaster with a keen attention to detail – every shot, every roast, every organic coffee strives for first-day freshness. With three coffee shops and an online retail store, Zoka continues to break new ground in the coffee community.

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Emma Thesenvitz
Portent Interactive
206-575-3740 ext. 114
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Jeff Babcock
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