Social Security Initiative Helps Early-Onset Alzheimer's Patients Get the Care They Need

Share Article

The Social Security Administration’s recent expansion of its Compassionate Allowance is an important step toward helping Americans younger than 65 with conditions such as early-onset Alzheimer’s disease get the care they need, says Patricia O'Dea-Evans, a geriatric care manager and co-owner of A Silver Connection, a free Chicago-area eldercare and senior housing referral service.

A Silver Connection helps Alzheimer's patients of all ages and their families find the housing and care option that bests fits their health status, lifestyle, location and budget, and that has the required level of support.

The Social Security Administration’s recent expansion of its Compassionate Allowance is an important step toward helping Americans younger than 65 with conditions such as early-onset Alzheimer’s disease get the care they need, says Patricia O'Dea-Evans, a geriatric care manager and co-owner of A Silver Connection (http://www.asilverconnection.com), a free Chicago-area eldercare and senior housing referral service.

The move, which took effect March 1, added 38 diseases and medical conditions to the list of those that qualify for Social Security and Supplemental Security Income disability benefits, and helps ensure that applicants’ benefits requests are processed quickly.

“As care managers, we sympathized with younger Alzheimer’s patients who previously had to forgo in-home care or assisted living because they couldn’t qualify for Social Security benefits and lacked sufficient financial resources to pay for it on their own,” she says. “We’re gratified that this population now has an additional resource to help them pay for the care they need.”

Early-onset Alzheimer’s can be diagnosed in people in their 30s, 40s and 50s with symptoms that include forgetfulness, confusion, poor judgment, personality changes and social withdrawal. While the disease cannot be cured, prescription medication and alternative medicine can be used to slow its progression.

“Alzheimer’s also takes a toll on spouses and other family members who become caregivers and end up needing their own form of support,” adds O’Dea-Evans.

A Silver Connection helps Alzheimer’s patients of all ages and their families find the housing and care option that best fits their health status, lifestyle, location and budget, and that has the required level of support.

For more information, or to speak with a senior care consultant, call 866-421-8266 or visit http://www.asilverconnection.com.

About A Silver Connection
A Silver Connection is a free eldercare resource network operating throughout the Chicago area for seniors, their families and professionals who help older adults. It specializes in senior housing and care options, including retirement communities, independent living, assisted living, memory care, supportive living, skilled nursing, and in-home care.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Cynthia Martin

847-864-9540
Email >
Visit website