Slimmed Down Stockport Dad with Diabetes Runs Great Manchester Run for Family

Share Article

Peter Clitheroe, 36, from Offerton, Stockport, is currently raising funds and training hard for the Great Manchester Run on 16 May. The 10km challenge is that bit tougher for Peter as he has Type 2 diabetes.

I’ve never done anything like the Great Manchester Run before; I’ve always hated running so not sure why I decided to do it but I’m actually enjoying the training and looking forward to the race day. I’ve been running every other night and using our Nintendo Wii Fit for other exercise.

Peter Clitheroe, 36, from Offerton, Stockport, is currently raising funds and training hard for the Great Manchester Run on 16 May. The 10km challenge is that bit tougher for Peter as he has Type 2 diabetes.

Father of two, Peter was diagnosed in November 2007 and had been warned previously about developing Type 2 diabetes as he had always been heavily overweight. People are at increased risk if they are overweight or have a large waistline, have a family history of diabetes and are aged over 40. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or the insulin that is produced doesn’t work properly. Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition that, if not diagnosed early enough or managed effectively, can lead to complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and amputation. Type 2 diabetes is treated with a healthy diet and regular physical activity, but medication and/or insulin is often required.

“I was 23 stones, 10 pounds at my biggest but always had the attitude of ‘Oh well, I’ll be OK…’”, explains Peter.

“Then one day I went to my GP with a recurring eye problem. He said I hadn’t had my blood tested for sometime and asked if I would mind. I agreed, the blood test came back and it was clear I had Type 2 diabetes.

“The strange thing was I didn’t seem to have any symptoms. I always put being tired down to being overweight and unfit, but maybe now it’s clear there was more to it than that.”

Type 2 diabetes can go undetected for 10 years or more, meaning half of people already have complications by the time they are diagnosed. The signs and symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst, going to the loo (for a wee) all the time especially at night, extreme tiredness, weight loss, blurred vision, genital itching or regular episodes of thrush or slow healing of wounds. If you’re older you may put the symptoms down to ‘getting on a bit’. It is recommended to ask your GP for a diabetes test if any of the symptoms apply to you as taking early action is key.

After the initial shock Peter soon came to see his diagnosis as the catalyst he needed to lose weight.

“In one sense it was the best thing that could have happened to me. I had always yo-yoed with my weight and had been far too overweight and since my University days in the early 1990s I’d fluctuated between 19 and 24 stone.

“I joined Weightwatchers just over a year ago and since then have lost four and a half stones. I now weigh 15 stones and am aiming to lose a further stone. I’ve become far more conscious about what and how much I eat and definitely have no intention of going back to where I was. Looking at old photos makes me finally realise how big I was and how much my health must have been at risk”, said Peter.

Peter now combines healthy eating, increased physical activity with tablet medication three times a day. By controlling his weight he is almost able to control his diabetes naturally, the tablets acting as a secondary treatment. Training for the Great Manchester Run has given Peter a focus for his new-found energy.

“The high point of losing the weight is definitely the fact that I have become fitter, healthier and less tired. I can now chase after my five and three year olds without feeling cream-crackered after five yards!”, said Peter.

“I’ve never done anything like the Great Manchester Run before; I’ve always hated running so not sure why I decided to do it but I’m actually enjoying the training and looking forward to the race day. I’ve been running every other night and using our Nintendo Wii Fit for other exercise.”

“I am now a fit and healthy husband and father. My wife has been incredibly supportive in helping me lose the weight and if truth be known, I doubt I would’ve been as successful as I have been without her help. I’m a very lucky man”, Peter said.

There are 11, 768 people diagnosed with diabetes in Stockport PCT and an estimated 2,300 people who have Type 2 diabetes but don’t realise it.

Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes include being over 40 years old, being of Black or South Asian origin and having a family history of the condition. At risk waist measurements are 37 inches or more for men, except those of South Asian origin who are at risk at 35 inches or more, and 31.5 inches or more for all women.

Charity Places are still available if you would like to be part of the Diabetes UK team at the Great Manchester Run.
Visit http://www.diabetes.org.uk/gmr , or call 01925 644 572.

If you would like to sponsor Peter for the Great Manchester Run you can do so via his Justgiving web address: http://www.justgiving.com/PNEPete-Manchester-run

Diabetes UK’s Get Serious campaign aims to get as many people as possible to sign up and join them in the fight against diabetes. Visit http://www.diabetes.org.uk/GetSerious and simply add your name and email address to show your support.

ISDN facilities available

For further media information, please contact Huw Beale or Maria Lam in the Diabetes UK Media Relations Team on 0207 424 1165 or email pressteam@diabetes.org.uk.

For urgent out of hours media enquiries, please call 07711 176 028.

Notes to editor:

1 Diabetes UK is the leading charity for the three million people in the UK with diabetes. We aim to spend more than £6.5 million on research in 2010 as well as campaigning and providing information and support. For more information visit http://www.diabetes.org.uk
2 In the UK, there are currently 2.6 million people diagnosed with diabetes and it is estimated that up to half a million people have Type 2 diabetes but do not know it.
3 The Diabetes UK Careline (0845 120 2960) offers information and support on any aspect of managing diabetes. The line is a low cost number and opens Monday to Friday between 9am and 5pm (operates a translation service). Recorded information on a number of diabetes-related topics is also available on this number 24 hours a day.
4 Supporting our work to fund vital research into the care, treatment and hopefully a cure for diabetes as a Diabetes UK Supporting Member entitles you to a range of benefits including our bi-monthly magazine Balance, reliable information booklets on diabetes, our confidential Diabetes UK Careline, over 400 local Diabetes UK support groups, and access to an exclusive personalised Supporting Members Area on our website.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Huw Beale
Visit website