World Vision Malaria Experts Available for Comment as World Malaria Day Approaches April 25

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With World Malaria Day on April 25 and mere months left to meet the global 2010 targets in the fight against the disease, World Vision’s End Malaria campaign is leading a summit of concerned citizens and public health specialists from the U.S. and Zambia to press American congressional leaders to keep investing in programs that are saving the lives of children and mothers worldwide.

Malaria infects an estimated 250 million individuals a year, causing billions of dollars worth of lost economic and educational productivity across hard-hit countries.

With mere months left to meet the global 2010 targets in the fight against malaria, World Vision'sEnd Malaria campaign is leading a summit of concerned citizens and public health specialists on Capitol Hill to press American congressional leaders to hold up their commitments to anti-malaria programs that are saving the lives of children and mothers worldwide.

Although it is preventable and treatable with low-cost measures, malaria kills more than 2,000 children under the age of five each day, making it a leading cause of childhood death. It infects an estimated 250 million individuals a year, causing billions of dollars worth of lost economic and educational productivity across hard-hit countries, particularly in Africa.

World Vision works in 62 malaria-endemic countries and is experienced in providing malaria prevention and treatment solutions in vulnerable communities through the support of the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) and its own End Malaria campaign.

These malaria control experts will be in Washington, D.C. the week of April 19 and available for interviews:

Batuke Walusiku, World Vision Zambia
Walusiku has most recently served as Chief of Party for RAPIDS (Reaching HIV and AIDS Affected People with Integrated Development and Support), a World Vision-led consortium in Zambia including CARE International, Catholic Relief Services, Expanded Church Response, The Salvation Army and Africare. She has been supervising Malaria and HIV and AIDS initiatives in Zambia including community distribution of 485,000 insecticide treated bednets (ITNs), funded by the U.S. government through PEPFAR, private corporations and foundations in partnership with the Government of the Republic of Zambia through the Ministry of Health’s National Malaria Control Center.

Craig Jaggers, Policy Adviser for Global Health, World Vision U.S.
Jaggers, MPH, counsels senior leadership on health policies, analyzes and promotes initiatives that impact the health and well-being of children worldwide, and advocates with senior U.S. government officials on related matters. Prior to joining World Vision, he advised U.S. Senator Evan Bayh on health and social policy, and provided research and analysis for nutrition and HIV/AIDS programs for the Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance Project. He has worked in Ethiopia, Egypt and Switzerland, and holds an MPH with a concentration in global health policy from The George Washington University and a B.A. in biology from Taylor University.

Dr. Mark Maire, Senior Health Specialist for Infectious Disease, World Vision U.S.
Maire has served as a Senior Technical Advisor at USAID/Zambia for the Presidential Malaria Initiative, providing leadership and oversight in the implementation of malaria activities, and as a fellow with the Johns Hopkins Health and Child Survival program. His has also previously worked in Bolivia and Indonesia. He holds a D.O. from Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Geraldine Ryerson-Cruz

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