Close the Door on Cabin Fever with an Introductory Flying Lesson from LetsGoFlying.com

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Many agree that this winter was the one of the worst in recorded history. Just as we were recovering from one significant snowstorm, another was on its way. But now spring is finally here, the weather’s getting warmer and the flowers are beginning to bloom. And what better way to get a good look at Mother Nature’s beauty than by enjoying the outdoors from new heights — from the pilot’s seat of an airplane.

“Whether you’ve dreamed of flying an airplane, or just want to view nature from a different perspective, taking an introductory flight is a fun, easy way to say goodbye to cabin fever.

Many agree that this winter was the one of the worst in recorded history. Just as we were recovering from one significant snowstorm, another was on its way. But now spring is finally here, the weather’s getting warmer and the flowers are beginning to bloom. And what better way to get a good look at Mother Nature’s beauty than by enjoying the outdoors from new heights — from the pilot’s seat of an airplane.

“Whether you’ve dreamed of flying an airplane, or just want to view nature from a different perspective, taking an introductory flight is a fun, easy way to say goodbye to cabin fever,” says Craig Fuller, president of the nonprofit Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA).

It all starts with Let’s Go Flying, a learn-to-fly program sponsored by AOPA, where you’ll actually fly an airplane under the direction of an FAA-licensed flight instructor. You’ll sit in the pilot’s seat, take the controls, taxi out to the runway and finally pull back on the yoke as you take off and soar into the wild blue yonder.

Just go to the Let’s Go Flying website, http://www.letsgoflying.com, where you’ll find a database of more than 3,500 flight schools. Many offer introductory flights for about $99; just enter your zip code to find the one closest to you. Plus, the site is jam-packed with everything you need to know about earning a private pilot’s certificate.

“There’s nothing like the freedom of flight,” notes Fuller. “And at this time of year the view from 3,000 feet is simply incredible.”

With more than 415,000 members, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association represents nearly three-quarters of all U.S. pilots. Since 1939, AOPA has represented the interests of general aviation, which covers all flying except the scheduled airlines and the military. Its headquarters are in Frederick, Md.

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you’d like to speak with an expert about learning to fly or AOPA’s national Let’s Go Flying learn-to-fly program, contact Nicole Lasorda (nicole (at) bartgil (dot) com; 215-592-8601) or Jo Ann Guear (joann (at) bartgil (dot) com; 215-592-8601).

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Jo Ann Guear

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