BlueAvocado and “Schlumpy” Get the Ball Rolling in Support of Earth Day Network's Billion Acts of Green™

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Change Rolls On as Earth Day Attendees Pledged to Avoid Consuming 500,000 Plastic Bags Annually - BlueAvocado’s “Schlumpy”, an 8-foot ball covered in 1,000 plastic bags (the number an average family uses in a year), joined Earth Day Founder Denis Hayes, John Legend, Sting and 150,000 attendees at the largest climate rally in history as he rolled on the lawn and bounced among the crowds inviting Earth Day attendees on the National Mall to stop using plastic bags. A symbol for environmental problems too big to ignore, Schlumpy has “rolled” around the country, from Los Angeles to New York, raising awareness about the damaging environmental effects of plastic bags and inviting Americans to kick their diet of more than 100 billion plastic bags each year as a first step on a green journey.

BlueAvocado’s “Schlumpy”, an 8-foot ball covered in 1,000 plastic bags (the number an average family uses in a year), joined Earth Day Founder Denis Hayes, John Legend, Sting and 150,000 attendees at the largest climate rally in history as he rolled on the lawn and bounced among the crowds inviting Earth Day attendees on the National Mall to stop using plastic bags. A symbol for environmental problems too big to ignore, Schlumpy has “rolled” around the country, from Los Angeles to New York, raising awareness about the damaging environmental effects of plastic bags and inviting Americans to kick their diet of more than 100 billion plastic bags each year as a first step on a green journey. BlueAvocado will add 1,000 Earth Day pledges to avoid 500,000 plastic bags annually to Earth Day Network’s Billion Acts of Green, demonstrating the easy steps we can take to avoid waste, prevent degradation of marine life, and invite personal change.

“With the recent scientific discovery of more garbage patch islands in the Atlantic Ocean, BlueAvocado has accelerated its mission to get Americans to kick their dependence on plastic bags,” says co-founder and Chief Ozone Officer Amy George of BlueAvocado. “If just one family makes the switch to a reusable grocery bag system, they will avoid 1,000 plastic bags a year. If one million of us do it, we can avoid one billion plastic bags and an estimated 50 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions - the equivalent to planting 2.8 million trees. And our research shows us that this is a first step to bigger change. Six in ten of us will go on to do more, once we make the switch to reusable bags.”

Last year the United Nations, called on every country to ban plastic bags because they choke marine life worldwide. Once BlueAvocado achieves its goal of getting Americans to personally pledge to avoid 1 billion bags, the company will make a donation to the Ocean Conservancy, an international non-profit committed to international coastal cleanup and finding scientific solutions to save marine life.

About BlueAvocado
A women-owned, green business launched in November 2008, BlueAvocado is making it easy to “do good and get it done” by offering lifestyle products that inspire people to easily reduce their environmental impact in style. BlueAvocado's portfolio of "hot products for a cool planet" change behavior in the grocery aisle, lunch room, and beyond. BlueAvocado products are made with care, using increased Repreve™ fabric, made from recycled bottles and waste yarn, and an audited carbon footprint label identifying the carbon avoided with each trip. To date BlueAvocado fans have helped avoid more than 22 million plastic bags and 1 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions in the next year. For a copy of the company’s One Planet™ Sustainability charter or to read about what the company is doing this Earth Day, visit our website and blog at http://www.blueavocado.com. Do good @ http://www.blueavocado.com. BlueAvocado™ and gro-pak® are trademarks of BlueAvocado Co.

View recent footage of Billion Bag Pledge @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W60AslL9bMQ&feature=player_embedded

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Paige Davis
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