PNC Bank Adds Nine More LEED™ Certified Green Buildings; Expands Efforts with Eco-Friendly Interior Renovations

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The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has certified nine more Green Branch® locations of PNC Bank based on environmentally friendly construction and design, boosting its total to 77 LEED™ certified green buildings.

PNC Green Branch® Exterior View

We are applying the same sustainable approach toward interior building renovations that we have used for the past decade with new construction.

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has certified nine more Green Branch® locations of PNC Bank based on environmentally friendly construction and design, boosting its total to 77 LEED™ certified green buildings.

In 2002 PNC became the first major U.S. bank to design and build environmentally friendly LEED certified bank branches in the United States. It is the only bank permitted to use the term Green Branch® based on the registered trademark granted by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. The trademark is affirmation of PNC’s leadership and commitment to green business practices since 2000.

Gary Saulson, PNC’s director of corporate real estate, said the bank, which has more newly constructed certified green buildings than any company on Earth, continues to evolve its innovative approach to eco-friendly business practices.

“We are applying the same sustainable approach toward interior building renovations that we have used for the past decade with new construction,” Saulson said. “Over the next year, we will expand our use of the LEED for Commercial Interior (LEED-CI) standards to more major buildings and retail locations, including 10 branches that are open for business and certification is pending.”

PNC has already achieved LEED-CI certification for one branch and one office location. The company also has 10 branches and two offices that are open for business and pending certification.

The completion 10 years ago of the 650,000 square foot PNC Firstside Center in Pittsburgh was at that time the largest LEED-certified building in the world and kicked off a green building boom by PNC during which all new construction is built to LEED standards. Today, PNC has 77 certified buildings (75 for new construction and two for interiors).

The bank’s Green Branch® features include:

  • Materials: more than 50 percent of the branch is locally manufactured or made from recycled or green materials.
  • Energy & Water Efficiency: energy usage is reduced 35 percent or more compared to a traditional branch; water usage is reduced by 4,000 gallons a year and window walls are three times more efficient than code.
  • Pollution Control: construction waste is recycled or salvaged and the cooling system is designed to protect the ozone.

The newly certified Green Branch® locations are in four states. PNC has more newly constructed certified green buildings than any other company on Earth, and all 77 certified locations can be found via http://www.pnc.com/green:

Pennsylvania
Gibsonia – Grandview Crossing, 505 Grandview Crossing Drive (Greater Pittsburgh)
Glenn Mills – Concordville, 1823 Wilmington Pike (Greater Philadelphia)
Lower Nazareth – 3790 Dryland Way (Greater Philadelphia)

Virginia (Greater Washington area)
Herndon – Dulles Center, 13490 Coppermine Road
Dulles – Dulles 28, 22045 Dulles Retail Plaza
Falls Church – Bailey’s Crossroads, 3558 S. Jefferson St.

New Jersey
Flanders – 293 Route 206, Unit 21
Williamstown – 1424 South Black Horse Pike

Delaware
Rehoboth – 19745 Sea Air Avenue, Rehoboth Beach

The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (NYSE: PNC) is one of the nation's largest diversified financial services organizations providing retail and business banking; residential mortgage banking; specialized services for corporations and government entities, including corporate banking, real estate finance and asset-based lending; wealth management; asset management and global fund services (http://www.pnc.com). Follow @PNCNews on Twitter for breaking news, updates and announcements from PNC.

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Alan Aldinger
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