Fundraiser for Documentary Highlighting Taos Artist, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Held on May 19

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Luhan Helped Shape Modern-Day Taos Art Community

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This controversial woman not only mobilized world class artists to be inspired by and move to Taos, but she galvanized them to speak out on behalf of Taos Pueblo who struggled to keep their land from being taken away.

The Taos Gallery will host a fundraising event from 4:30 p.m.to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 19 to support a documentary film, “Awakening in Taos,” about 20th century modernist, Mabel Dodge and her husband Tony Lujan, and how they impacted Taos’ art community, making it what it is today.

Mark Gordon and Vision Marketing Associates created the Documentary by interviewing a number of people in Taos that have a connection to Luhan. Gordon plans on adding a second part to the documentary, funds permitting, which will show how Luhan’s legacy has impacted and shaped the Taos art community today. Proceeds from the fundraiser will go towards production of the second half.

Once completed, the documentary is intended for distribution through PBS networks throughout the country, and for sale at bookstores and Museums in New Mexico.

“I felt I needed to create ‘Awakening in Taos’ to share the perfect New Mexico story of Mabel Dodge Luhan and her influence on the art and people of Taos,” said Gordon. “This controversial woman not only mobilized world class artists to be inspired by and move to Taos, but she galvanized them to speak out on behalf of Taos Pueblo who struggled to keep their land from being taken away. ”

Prior to living in Taos, Luhan lived in New York and encouraged the likes of Georgia O’Keeffe; writers like D.H. Lawrence; photographers like Ansel Adams; John Reed, the independent journalist who reported from and died in the Bolshevik Revolution; and John Collier, founder of the Indian New Deal, to come to Taos. Their art was changed because of their interaction with Dodge Luhan and because of the inspiration they drew from Taos’ land and the Pueblo.

Born before the 20th Century, Luhan embodied the paradigm of a progressive New Woman in the Modern Era.

Dodge Luhan was a writer, artist, visionary thinker, philosopher, salon hostess, and creative catalyst for social change. She married Tony Lujan, a Taos Pueblo Indian, at a time when prejudiced against native americans was high. Her name was later changed to “Luhan,” with an “H” to make it easier to pronounce.

Luhan inspired vision and freethinking ideals, which paved the way for change. She was passionate and vocal about supporting social and environmental issues in the early part of the century. As a writer and columnist for Hearst newspapers, she had a national audience for her ideas.

The issues that commanded her attention back then, are the same issues that we confront and understand in our world today: vanishing wilderness, living sustainably, creating an inclusive community, building bridges between races and cultures, finding the balance between modern living/industrialization, creative expression and spirituality.

Awakening in Taos” will be shown throughout the duration of the fundraising event on May 19th. The documentary can also be viewed at http://www.awakeningintaos.com.

There is no fee to attend the fundraising event, however, donations are strongly encouraged to ensure that the documentary can be completed and distributed. Refreshments will be served.

The Fundraiser will be held at Taos Gallery, 133 Bent Street in Taos. For more information, contact the Taos Gallery at 575-758-3911.

Contact:
Erica Asmus-Otero
(505) 259-2202
Erica(at)griffinassoc(dot)com

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